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In a Bind

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Amour Courtois


Naiilo

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Marie de France

 

Andreas Capellanus

 

De Amore

 

Lanval

 

Bisclavret

 

Laustic

 

Chevrefoil

 

 

I recently gave a presentation on these topics. Interesting times, those middle ages were. But I have been thinking about how much L'arte de Amour Courtois applies to contemporary art forms. I've posted the 31 "Rules of Love" for you all to check out....

 

1. Marriage is no real excuse for not loving.

2. He who is not jealous cannot love.

3. No one can be bound by a double love.

4. It is well known that love is always increasing or decreasing.

5. That which a lover takes against his will of his beloved has no relish.

6. Boys do not love until they arrive at the age of maturity.

7. When one lover dies, a widowhood of two years is required of the survivor.

8. No one should be deprived of love without the very best of reasons.

9. No one can love unless he is impelled by the persuasion of love.

10. Love is always a stranger in the home of avarice.

11. It is not proper to love any woman whom one should be ashamed to seek to marry.

12. A true lover does not desire to embrace in love anyone except his beloved.

13. When made public love rarely endures.

14. The easy attainment of love makes it of little value; difficulty of attainment makes it prized.

15. Every lover regularly turns pale in the presence of his beloved.

16. When a lover suddenly catches sight of his beloved his heart palpitates.

17. A new love puts to flight an old one.

18. Good character alone makes any man worthy of love.

19. If love diminishes, it quickly fails and rarely revives.

20. A man in love is always apprehensive.

21. Real jealousy always increases the feeling of love.

22. Jealousy, and therefore love, are increased when one suspects his beloved.

23. He whom the thought of love vexes, eats and sleeps very little.

24. Every act of a lover ends with in the thought of his beloved.

25. A true lover considers nothing good except what he thinks will please his beloved.

26. Love can deny nothing to love.

27. A lover can never have enough of the solaces of his beloved.

28. A slight presumption causes a lover to suspect his beloved.

29. A man who is vexed by too much passion usually does not love.

30. A true lover is constantly and without intermission possessed by the thought of his beloved.

31. Nothing forbids one woman being loved by two men or one man by two women

 

There is no original, though these were translated from Latin.

 

 

Interesting, I think.

 

 

See you...

 

 

*BTW - My French is horrible, so if you see an error: I apologize in advance.

4 Comments


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And upon what definition did the author of this list rely on to ennumerate the 31 rules of love??

 

Oh well, I 'am' a teenager, so I guess I cannot love. Such disparities are the cause of endless suffering and broken hearts, I guess.

0:) Birds

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I suppose that these 31 aphorisms are as true to today as they were when first penned. They remind me a little of Hawaii's climate, where the variation from season to season is dwarfed by the variation from day to day. Similarly, the variation in validity of these 31 ditties over the centuries must surely pale before the variation from person to person.

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I suppose that these 31 aphorisms are as true to today as they were when first penned. They remind me a little of Hawaii's climate, where the variation from season to season is dwarfed by the variation from day to day. Similarly, the variation in validity of these 31 ditties over the centuries must surely pale before the variation from person to person.

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The neat thing about these rules is that they were not actually used in court, or anywhere else. They are influences on art, but not rules for life and living. Compare the list to several contemporary Pop genre songs, or a recent love-themed movie. Also, the rest of De Amore contains accounts and judgments on situations between lovers which greatly apply to, of all strange things, celebrity relationships and sitcoms. And many men (and women) still do practice placing thier woman (or man) on a pedestal (think of women saying that their husbands treat them like queens, or men stating that they are their partner's prince, or women saying that they are princess to their partner).

 

 

As for the concept behind these rules: The concept came from stories, fables, and religious beliefs of the time. Capellanus wrote De Amore on commission of the Countess of Champagne---who contributed to Chretien de Troyes' "Knight of the Cart" poem where Sir Lancelot is originally from.

 

 

~V\/3i|2])~

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