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Is he a comedian?

 

Edit: Clues are: pic was taken in 70s/80s, He is important in the last decade(s), and a TV Personality. All of this suggests that the man is now older and is a contemporary in TV....

 

Hm... Paya did say he had cunning eyes: maybe suggesting that he has great wit and/or a great sense of humor. So he may in fact be a comedian... :o the Dimples! :D He is a TV Host and Comedian:

 

Stephen Colbert!!!

 

I hope I got that right :unsure:

Edited by Drew Espinosa
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Here's a brief biography of Henri Cartier-Bresson and some examples of his work:   http://www.lomography.com/magazine/lifestyle/2011/03/15/best-of-the-best-henri-cartier-bresson?utm_source=www&u

Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou and thy impossibly firm and toned butt cheeks...ahh there they are.  Would you crack these walnuts for me thanks awfully much.

I knew who it was as soon as I saw the face, the camera size was obviously a Lecia, that confirmed him.  He was the God of Street photography.  His name did not interest me because I did not recognise

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YES! Great deduction, Drew!  :worship:  :2thumbs:

 

Your turn to post a new challenge! ;-)

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Ooh! Yay!!! :D :D :D

Let's see... Oh here's one! :D

 

wiles5-173x300.jpg

 

Hint 1: He is/was British

Hint 2: He is/was involved in my favorite subject

PS: Is he alive or dead? You'll just have to find out  ;) Good luck!

 

What is he most famous for???

 

*Oh, if this image was already used, I apologize :)

Edited by Drew Espinosa
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Ooh! Yay!!! :D :D :D

Let's see... Oh here's one! :D

 

wiles5-173x300.jpg

 

Hint 1: He is/was British

Hint 2: He is/was involved in my favorite subject

PS: Is he alive or dead? You'll just have to find out  ;) Good luck!

 

*Oh, if this image was already used, I apologize :)

 

 

/me nudges Drew....

 

His name is in the photo....  *cough*

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I haven't looked but watched a TV doc last night on a certain famous naturalist - my fingers wanted to type naturist :P

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best-bobs-01_16402757601_zpswfbrmajc.jpg

 

Sorry for the late start. Also, I have no idea what I'm doing so bare with me.

 

Hint 1: Fashion

Hint 2: Perfume

Hint 3: She "C"s you.

Edited by RomanRomaan
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  • 3 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Hmmm...a week with no guesses.  And here I though this one was too easy to post.

 

Maybe this hint will help.  Her TV series was cancelled during the 5th series (finale aired in June 2015), but she's still doing guest shots.

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Hmmm...a week with no guesses.  And here I though this one was too easy to post.

 

Maybe this hint will help.  Her TV series was cancelled during the 5th series (finale aired in June 2015), but she's still doing guest shots.

I hoped others would answer :) Well, from the picture and your hint, the person is Betty White :D

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  • 2 months later...

Since this took a break, but I enjoyed going through many of the pages of photos and responses and didn't see this next one (though if I missed it, please accept my apologies), I'll restart it:

 

4111c7dfc7d7ba655c99f10f8b5afedc.jpg

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My apologies... and thank you for reminding me... so, ammended:

 

Since this took a break, but I enjoyed going through many of the pages of photos and responses and didn't see this next one (though if I missed it, please accept my apologies), I'll restart it:

 

4111c7dfc7d7ba655c99f10f8b5afedc.jpg

Clue #1 - Not known for baseball

Clue #2 - Musically inclined

Clue #3 - No longer living

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