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Dead-Composers Society


AC Benus

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On 12/13/2021 at 11:10 AM, AC Benus said:

You and I have spoken about Plentev before, and I think we agree how inspiring his interpretations are (especially with the much neglected CPE Bach). But as for recordings, I much prefer his 1989 studio setting of Haydn's c minor piano sonata. Perhaps you have the album as I do?

 

 

 

As you mentioned in your post, the expressiveness in this performances is wonderful to listen to

I agree it is a better performance, I've listened to it before. There's just something about live performances, though and being able to watch the pianist's hands that made me want to share the live video.

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7 hours ago, Lux Apollo said:

Now for something a little happier to cheer your day up - a mid-career Haydn symphony:

 

I remember being 17 and sitting on a plane listening to their Classical stream, which repeated every hour, just ravished by La reine. It was my first taste of Haydn, and the opening of the first movement was mesmerizing. Which I knew whose performance it was... 

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24 minutes ago, Parker Owens said:

Not sure why my ear is fixed upon this today - maybe it's the impending day of exam-grading coming up...

 

 

I've never heard this before. Listening, I can see the little innocent heads of your charges lined up to meet their mathematical doom!  *evil laugh* Whaaaa-whaaaa-wa

If you need some calm music to shake the gloom away, listen to this andante. The performance was made by Shostakovich's son (or grandson; I forget which...). It's stunning!

 

Edited by AC Benus
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Nikolai Medtner (1880-1951) was a Russian composer of Volga German origins. While he languished in obscurity following his death, he is now starting to be recognized as one of the most significant Russian composers for the piano. His many Fairy Tales for piano are lovely, evocative pieces, including this delight:

 

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16 minutes ago, Lux Apollo said:

Nikolai Medtner (1880-1951) was a Russian composer of Volga German origins. While he languished in obscurity following his death, he is now starting to be recognized as one of the most significant Russian composers for the piano. His many Fairy Tales for piano are lovely, evocative pieces, including this delight:

 

First of all, it was performed beautifully. The music is very interesting: like Gottschalk and C.P.E Bach had a baby! 

I will be seeking out more of Medtner's work; thank you   

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Incredibly, 2Cellos’ version of AC/DC’s Thunderstruck exceed one billion views in October. It’s fun to imagine “Doc” Brown’s early flux capacitor experiments going horribly wrong in the 1970s, propelling the Young brothers back in time to 18th century Europe with no way back.

What could they do? They can’t record. But they can still do live gigs… :lol:

 

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14 hours ago, AC Benus said:

First of all, it was performed beautifully. The music is very interesting: like Gottschalk and C.P.E Bach had a baby! 

I will be seeking out more of Medtner's work; thank you   

Here's an article on Medtner, providing some perspective on why he's not more widely known:

https://www.esm.rochester.edu/blog/2013/10/why-medtner-matters/

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Today I bring to you French composer Edgard Varèse's Ameriques, a fascinating early work inspired by his travels in America. Varèse placed heavy emphasis on timbre and rhythm in his music, thinking about music as 'organized sound', a crystallization of sonic masses into a greater whole.

 

 

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Friedrich Kuhlau (1786-1832) was a Danish composer and pianist, a figure in the 'Danish Golden Age'. He introduced many of Beethoven's works to Danish audiences in Copenhagen. He had a considerable output of compositions, but sadly the true extent of his oeuvre is lost - everything unpublished was lost in a house fire, and thought to be a much larger output than the 200 published works he left behind for us to enjoy. He composed in many genres, including opera, but it is his piano sonatinas and sonatas that I know him best for - his music is fun, humourous and a joy to play for late intermediate and early advanced students.

 

Edited by Lux Apollo
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Haydn wrote over a hundred trios for viola, cello and baryton, a member of the viol family with a set of sympathetic resonating strings. These trios represent one of the most explored and highly developed genres of his early career, and many were designed for performance for amateurs with shorter and less technically demanding movements than his later symphonies and string quartets. They are a delight for the ear.

 

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