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Kitty

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About Kitty

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    Former Member

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  • Age in Years
    53
  • Gender
    Male
  • Sexuality
    Ask Me

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  1. *waves up the road at Conner*

    :)

  2. Hi Kitty! I haven't kept in touch. I suck. :( Miss you.

    Conner

  3. :) :) :)

    Well, reading your story was totally my pleasure. I'm looking forward to seeing what else you'll be writing. :)

  4. kitty- i just passed out from finding out you read my story. i knew you as the editor of someday out of the blue and revered you as a GA celebrity. thanks a lot for reading.

  5. Kitty

    The Sickness

    You have to remember that, although the American "founding fathers" understood about the need to keep religion separate from government, a large percentage of the people who actually settled the U.S. back in the 1600s-1700s were religious refugees. Some were more moderate and tolerant, such as the Quakers, and some were Catholics from southern Europe. However, a great many were Huguenots (from France), Palatines (from Germany), and other Calvinist Protestant types, who were the ancestors of today's American religious fundamentalists. I mean "ancestors" metaphorically as well as literally. It's not much of an exaggeration to say that the majority of today's Americans have some of those people in their family trees somewhere. Although most Americans may not hold those specific fundamentalist religious beliefs, the underlying cultural and psychological traits have carried through to America's current, mostly-unconscious belief system: judgmentalness, shame, a certain harsh approach to oneself and others, deep feelings of not being worthy, that life means working your butt off for very little and that's all you deserve ... and especially a very uneasy relationship with sexuality and death. It is a very fear-based way of living. Thus, the strong religiosity that Americans display does not astonish me at all. And by "religiosity", I don't mean being spiritual and adhering sincerely to the way of life taught by one's religion; I am referring to an overall sentimental attitude toward things religious. (And I have also been told by my European and UK friends that Americans are an incredibly sentimental bunch of people anyway. Sentimentality makes for a certain mental and emotional weakness on the part of people who function that way.) Kitty
  6. I love having an herb garden in pots. One hint ... the soil in pots dries out sooner than in a regular garden, and some herbs (rosemary and the mints **, for example) dry out quickly. So during the summer, you'll need to keep on eye on them. During the hot months on the Gulf Coast, I sometimes needed to water them every day. As Luc said, strawberries grow very well in containers. They even make special pots for strawberries. ** "Rosemary and the Mints" ... sounds like a musical group. Kitty
  7. Chosen By Lugh darkness, a serpentine form, the kaleidoscope eyes
  8. The special mystery writer of the reviews for the Spring Anthology didn't want to write Nick's for some reason and asked me to sit in for him. So here goes .... I hope I don't embarrass you when I say this, Nick ... but your writing just gets better and better. Although you started out a year or so ago focusing on the trials and tribulations of gay teens (and one gay teen in particular ), you are challenging yourself to stretch beyond the usual "coming out" story to encompass things that are part of the universal human condition. That's always a big risk, but a necessary one for any writer or artist (or in life, come to think of it.) As I read your latest GA anthology submission, the thing that struck me immediately was how well it showed what's going on in the minds and hearts of the characters. Very cleanly written, focussing the readers' attention on what you're trying to show us. I could give a little synopsis of what happens in this story, but really, it's about situations that any human can relate to -- having to deal with change, make decisions that affect others, and learn to relate to the people we love -- played out in one day in the life of a teen. It's a good story on any level at which one wants to read it, from the surface story to the deeper meaning. Kitty
  9. Definitely brings back some memories. Springtime in the Pacific Northwest brings many flowering trees, but we have no wisteria here. I really miss the wisteria.
  10. And I'd never try .... :)

  11. of course you are (: you'll never get rid of me

    XD

  12. This thread is for the discussion of the Spring 2007 Anthology story Vegas Sun by Shadowgod. *** SPOILER ALERT *** This thread contains details about the story. Be forewarned, in case you haven't read it yet.
  13. This thread is for the discussion of the Spring 2007 Anthology story Starbridge Train Station by Ieshwar. *** SPOILER ALERT *** This thread contains details about the story. Be forewarned, in case you haven't read it yet.
  14. This thread is for the discussion of the Spring 2007 Anthology story The New Job by Altimexis. *** SPOILER ALERT *** This thread contains details about the story. Be forewarned, in case you haven't read it yet.
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