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BeeJay

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2 Good Start

About BeeJay

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    Newbie

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  • Age in Years
    55
  • Favorite Genres
    Everything
  • Location
    Connecticut USA

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  1. BeeJay

    I agree. We have enough folks here in the U.S. who politicize COVID-19. On the other hand, to those who say it's much ado about nothing, let's remember back in the 1980s when the U.S. government decided to ignore HIV and AIDS. Cornoavirus needs attention, but it doesn't need to dominate our lives.

  2. 15 out of 15 for me. I've always been a good speller, much to the irritation of my friends. I can't seem to refrain from checking restaurant menus for misspellings. In fact, there's a typo on the "About GA" page on this site that I'm itching to point out to the powers that be, but it's good discipline for me to keep my OCD in check.
  3. Instead of "Didn't you use to go out with my sister?", which sounds stilted and almost archaic to my ears, I would recommend "You used to go out with my sister, didn't you?" This is another workaround in English, and is analogous to other languages that have idioms and particles such as "n'est-ce pas?", "nicht wahr?" and "
  4. I was happy to see the specific rule cited for coordinate adjectives. I've had a devil of a time convincing authors that there's a difference between "cold, blustery day" and "big red ball" in terms of comma use, and have even had authors request that their manuscripts be transferred to another editor because of my insistence on this distinction. (But then again, I've angered authors by my insistence on the difference between "it's" and "its," so I guess I shouldn't be too surprised.) When I was a proofreader at Princeton University Press (in antediluvian times), the serial comma was referred to as the "Princeton comma," and was required in all books we published. So the commas in "Mary, Nancy, Pansy, and I" were mandatory, not optional.
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