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Juan Manuel Sandoval

Poet: Poet
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39 A Little More Kick Ass

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About Juan Manuel Sandoval

  • Rank
    Newbie

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Sexuality
    Gay
  • Favorite Genres
    Adventure
    Comedy
    Drama
    Fantasy
    Historical
    Mystery
    Romance
    Sci-Fi
    Thriller/Suspense
    Western
  • Location
    Chicago, Illinois
  • Interests
    Poetry, manga, anime, education, music (pop, country, indie, alternative), baking, gaming

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  1. The tousled sheets smell of summer musk and are ripened in the sharp, watchful eye of dusk. He stands there, smoking in a shimmering haze but, what’s wrong, my fingers sift through the maze and I collapse onto a yellow linoleum embrace. He draws close covered only in a black forest, the bark of his roots vast, and a strange smile, sickly sweet, begins to manifest. It’s then that I notice the rippling mast of the silent moon sail and the piercing call of the gales. The smell of the goldfish tank tickling my nose and the plucked petals of the red rose. Stop! Stop it! Stop him! Where are my clothes?
  2. Hi everyone! I’ve only recently joined the site, but it’s felt so warm and welcoming that I thought it’d be interesting to share something for discussion. I write poetry in both English and Spanish and only recently have begun to blend both my languages within poems. I was having in interesting exchange with a professor at my university this year where I confessed that sometimes I felt pressured to offer translated versions of my writing, while sacrificing the value of what a Spanish word or phrase was adding to my poem in order to please non-Spanish speaking readers. I mentioned I had begun blending the two languages without offering translations and he said I shouldn’t feel obliged to offer translations. He said readers shouldn’t force a type of language or culture censorship where the value of a piece is diminished because they can’t simply put the effort to translate words and phrases themselves or research the context of a piece. I’m curious if anyone else has thought about this dilemma of culture and language in your poetry and whether you share the professors opinion or have something else regarding it. It’ll be lovely to discuss!
  3. @AC Benus Como Agua Para Chocolate was a heavy influence for this so you definitely caught on well! I’ll have to look up and watch Fresa y chocolate which I haven’t seen. I’m happy you felt the Spanish bits and portion as well ❤️.
  4. A cup of milk served cold. Broken English that taste like batter, the long madrugada of Spanish flour that bakes up worries y cuentos and hopes. I wonder if this place is home. I am risen by yeast and the tears of leche I cry from the melting chocolate of my eyes. My whole life is inside la cocinita, baking. I wonder if I’ve gotten it right. I’ve got no recipe. The sugar that glazes my teeth lasts entre el dia but it's the lonely moon that melts my sweetness away. No more rosey frosting, no more flan. Just my naked loaf of a corazón, wishing for someone to knead it by hand. I’m a baker, a tiny little panadero juggling borrowed cinnamon and caramelos. But when I miscount the bubbles in the batter, lose la forma. When I drop the pan and scramble to eat the migas off the floor Always always, a set of hands Wrinkly and caramelized by heart, The chef of my heart, is there. She sings so softly that the batter sings back. She guides my shaking manos with her small, sure, manos, cracked caramel over smooth. We etch lace rosettes as not one, pero two. After all los pasteles hundidos, my milk tears dry, and her mitten hands hold my face. To me she whispers this: “Lo dulce es rosa, Lo dulce es harina, Pero también hay que llorar para llenar el frasco. Con tu dulce concha y tu leche fría de tristeza Ayi tenemos la receta de la vida.”
  5. Hi everyone! I’ve only recently joined the site, but it’s felt so warm and welcoming that I thought it’d be interesting to share something for discussion. I write poetry in both English and Spanish and only recently have begun to blend both my languages within poems. I was having in interesting exchange with a professor at my university this year where I confessed that sometimes I felt pressured to offer translated versions of my writing, while sacrificing the value of what a Spanish word or phrase was adding to my poem in order to please non-Spanish speaking readers. I mentioned I had begun blending the two languages without offering translations and he said I shouldn’t feel obliged to offer translations. He said readers shouldn’t force a type of language or culture censorship where the value of a piece is diminished because they can’t simply put the effort to translate words and phrases themselves or research the context of a piece. I’m curious if anyone else has thought about this dilemma of culture and language in your poetry and whether you share the professors opinion or have something else regarding it. It’ll be lovely to discuss!
  6. Hi and welcome! You can check out our little support group at 'Live-Poets Society.' You can always post work on that thread and see what people think. We're a supportive lot over there. Looking forward to reading more of your verse.

     

    https://www.gayauthors.org/forums/topic/41190-live-poets-society-–-a-corner-for-poetry/

     

     

    1. Juan Manuel Sandoval

      Juan Manuel Sandoval

      Thank you so much! I’ll definitely drop in to share and talk poetry. 

  7. Hi! My name is Juan Manuel Sandoval, but my family calls me Manuel. I’m a college student currently studying to become a teacher. People complain that I’m quite shy and soft spoken and I get a lot of weird stares from people on the CTA for the quirky outfits I wear, but I have a secret. I’m a magical boy with the power to create universes: the sailor guardian with the prettiest dreams Sailor Yume! When I use my magical pink-gold phone to type, every word comes to life. Every scary nightmare I see people suffering from I incase within a poem so that all they’ll have left are sweet dreams. Shimmering Sonnet Night! That’s the attack I use to take down the demons haunting people. Sometimes I get lonely, but it’s my duty to bring light to the world I love. It’s ok if I have to suffer a little as long as no one else ever feels alone again. So, whoever you are that’s reading this, I need you to open your heart and believe in me. Each one of these poems is full of the powerful shimmer of someone’s dreams or the hidden pains of their nightmares. Give them your strength and find strength in their struggle. Because each word warms with each read, giving life to a new day, a new dream. I am Sailor Yume the guardian of the twilight, the blurry emptiness between night and day. Can I just say, you’re dreams are quite lovely!
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