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Found 4 results

  1. Attention! This post does contain some actual swearing. Posted this to Tumblr earlier, where it was well-received. Thought I'd share with the community as well. There are a lot of comparatively mild curse words that we just accept as being family friendly without much thought as to where they come from. Some are just milder versions of a word we consider unacceptable, such as saying 'crap' instead of 'shit' or 'darn' instead of 'damn'. Others have so completely lost their original meanings that no one even considers them anymore. Here are some fairly common British ones, with pop-culture examples for your enjoyment: tosser n. One who masturbates; same as wanker. 'Who's Harry Potter?' 'Oh, no one. Bit of a tosser, really.' —Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (seen by millions of children) bugger, sod v. To sodomise someone n. One who sodomises 'Bludgers. Nasty little buggers.' —Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (Again, seen by millions of children) 'Sod this, you stay here if you want. On your own.' —Sherlock, S02E03: The Reichenbach Fall (prime time TV) berk n. Short for ‘Berkley Hunt’ or ‘Berkshire Hunt’, which is Cockney rhyming slang for ‘cunt’. 'Then what the hell did you tackle me for, you berk?' —Rupert Giles, Buffy the Vampire Slayer And there are so many more. Like, how many people who use the word 'douchebag' actually think about what that originally entailed?
  2. I guess I'm a little late in opening up the discussion, but life happens, and also so much has happened with ET. I'm delighted so many are reading and still enjoying the story of Luke Summers, his brother Simon and their friends and family. Hopefully - if you're here - you managed to get past the undoubtedly provocative title to discover that ET is so much more than that, crossing cultures and continents to track with the lives of two ordinary teens. It's always great to hear your perspective on the story. The last couple of chapters have dealt with 'The Hang', and with it the culture of an all boys school. I don't know what type of school you went to, but maybe you would be surprised that to know that things like this are not unheard of in single sex schools. Would love to hear your take. Riley READ HERE
  3. There's a story posted on GA I read a while ago. I can't remember the main characters name, but I do know he was involved with a military student by the name of Mike. They had a hot and cold relationship. There's was also an English foreign exchange student who he liked, but he had a hard time because he wasn't sure if the guy was gay or not. He acted jealous whenever he saw him with Mike. There was a part when Mike had cadets sing while they ran and asked him out. Mike had a confrontation and got banned from going back to the fraternity. The last chapter I read, the English dude confronted the main character because the fraternity he wanted to get into rejected him, and he thought he had something to do with it. If anyone can tell me the name of the story, it would be greatly appreciated. I'm so stupid. I remembered the name as soon as I hit submit. It's the English Year by Jwolf.
  4. What did Shakespeare’s English sound like to Shakespeare? To his audience? And how can we know such a thing as the phonetic character of the language spoken 400 years ago? These questions and more are addressed in the video above, which profiles a very popular experiment at London’s Globe Theatre, the 1994 reconstruction of Shakespeare’s theatrical home. Click for full article. I find this very interesting. It shows that for instance Irish and west country dialects are in many ways a lot closer to English the way it was spoken in Shakespeare's time than more 'refined' or 'straight-edged' dialects.
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