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Abortion: part 2


Demetz

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I would like to clarify that when I posted the previous blog I was highly frustrated for having been chewed out just previously for having an opinion on the issue at all. I have various reasons to be indignant about the events transpiring in that situation, but they're ultimately irrelevant to the issue of abortion and merely relate to the irrationality of the person I was misfortunate enough to speak near.

 

In spite of that person's protest that as a man I don't have a right to an opinion on the issue, as someone interested in public policy and planning to make a career in that field, I don't have the luxury of not having an opinion on the issue.

 

The opinion I do have on the issue was rather hastily written in the previous blog, but again, to clarify, my opinion is two-fold, one on what the current policy should be given current circumstances, and the second part concerning what circumstances should be striven toward in order to make way for a more amicable policy.

 

I'm not going to hide the fact that I don't like the concept of abortion. I also recognize that the decision to have an abortion is not an easy one and for the vast majority of women who undergo the procedure they have many very serious concerns which led them to it. From a policy perspective, I'm disinclined to seek to make abortion simply illegal; now or ever. Rather, at present I would leave it legal, but I would implement such policies as to reduce the frequency of unwanted pregnancies and in time seek to implement laws to regulate the process of allowing an abortion to take place.

 

To start, a greater public emphasis on family planning through birth control and especially the morning after pill. I have talked to so many people who either were unaware of the morning after pill or had been deceived into thinking it is an abortion pill that its appalling. A public which is well educated on means of birth control and not cornered into the abstinence only nonsense the present administration pushes is key to cutting down on the number of abortions.

 

The next step policy-wise would be to make it easier for women with unwanted pregnancies to make the decision to bring the baby to term. The first step (as I see it) to doing this is to reform child services so that its a viable alternative rather than the embarrassment that it is. Health care reforms so as to minimize the financial burdens are also necessary. I'm certain there are other things which could be done to make it easier on mothers with unwanted pregnancies to decide to bring the baby to term, but I think you can see where I'm going with this. I would also oppose any policy seeking to create disincentives to abortion rather than incentives to birth.

 

Whether, should the reforms I speak of be made and the demand for abortions drops dramatically, abortion should then be made illegal... I don't think making it illegal would be appropriate, considering that whatever may be the case in normative society exceptions always abound... but where I think making it illegal outright inappropriate, I also think a consultation and approval by a review board of some form would be appropriate.

 

I realize some of these positions will be found more agreeable than others, but I think it involves the right amount of compromise to be workable. On the one hand, the frequency of abortions will decline significantly - something the pro-lifers would applaud if we assume they have any integrity whatsoever, and the ability to have an abortion when needed is still preserved, which should appease the pro-choicers. I consider this a reasonable solution to a complicated issue.

 

Yet, reasonable as I may consider it to be, any such policies would face serious opposition by pro-lifers who are more interested in just stopping people from having sex because their religion scares them into thinking sex is immoral if its not for the explicit purpose of trying to create a child... and on the other side, there are many people who will oppose anything short of on-demand abortions and will see any policy aiming at reducing the demand for abortions as being a threat to the ability to have abortions period.

 

The middle path is not an easy road... more of a gauntlet on this issue.

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To start, a greater public emphasis on family planning through birth control and especially the morning after pill. I have talked to so many people who either were unaware of the morning after pill or had been deceived into thinking it is an abortion pill that its appalling. A public which is well educated on means of birth control and not cornered into the abstinence only nonsense the present administration pushes is key to cutting down on the number of abortions.

 

I agree with you completely with regard to a public that is well educated. The current abstinence only policy that many school systems are forced to promote is foolish. A more comprehensive program that includes abstinence as a choice along with birth control information makes better sense overall. The more information that is available, the better the chances of making an informed decision.

 

 

The next step policy-wise would be to make it easier for women with unwanted pregnancies to make the decision to bring the baby to term. The first step (as I see it) to doing this is to reform child services so that its a viable alternative rather than the embarrassment that it is. Health care reforms so as to minimize the financial burdens are also necessary. I'm certain there are other things which could be done to make it easier on mothers with unwanted pregnancies to decide to bring the baby to term, but I think you can see where I'm going with this. I would also oppose any policy seeking to create disincentives to abortion rather than incentives to birth.

 

I

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Each and every time I vote I have one litmus test that trumps them all. I will NEVER vote for any candidate who does not support the right of a woman to have full and complete reproductive freedom. It is beyond hubris for anyone to tell another adult human being what they can do with their body simply because they "disagree" with the choice. Your take the lives of real human beings and mess them up based on your whimsical and capricious decision that you know, better than they do, what is right for them.

 

I don't care if the woman is purposely having unprotected sex because she wants to get abortions because she like the feel of the anesthetic. When it comes to taking that parasite out of her body if she wants it out the decision is hers and hers alone.

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Purely from a global public policy perspective, I think abortion and all other types of family planning are crucial to limiting & slowing the growth of the human population on this planet.

 

Vic

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Purely from a global public policy perspective, I think abortion and all other types of family planning are crucial to limiting & slowing the growth of the human population on this planet.

Amen to that! :worship:

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Bringing a child to term cannot always be made a realistic option. For me, both times I had abortions, the being pregnant was the crisis. If a baby had materialized in our midst, it would not have been a terrible thing. (we love children: children are not difficult to live with: we already had children, so we were already doing children things: we wouldn't have needed to buy a lot of baby crap because we had what we thought was necessary and didn't believe in buying a lot of other stuff) But I was a necessary part of the picture, and there was a very real possibility that carrying a child to term would knock me out of the picture. I was not in immanent danger of dying either time I had an abortion, but my risk of ill health (bad enough to threaten my contribution to the economic life of the family, at least) or death was unacceptably elevated. Now, financial support would have helped somewhat, but it's cold comfort to replace mommy's wages when mommy's dead or ill.

 

That's the thing nobody ever wants to talk about when they talk about the ethics of pregnancy. Normal, healthy women die of complications of pregnancy and childbirth. It's a significant risk, even in developed countries (and significantly more in the US compared to many other developed countries). An acquaintance of mine did. She was healthy, except for some oddments, and then she was pre-eclamptic (as was I), and then eclampsia took her. Her husband was left with a motherless newborn. In my first pregnancy there came a moment where my husband was confronted with the possibility that either or neither of us -- me and the baby -- might survive. He told the doctor that if there was a point where only one of us could be saved, he wanted me.

 

(long story short, he got both of us. kid is all grown up now).

 

To me, every time a woman gets an abortion, she is in that moment of mine, where she has to choose her life over the life of a potential person. I think risking your life for the life of a person who is not here yet is a choice which cannot be second-guessed by bystanders. Not even the men who provide the sperm to make the potential person. Mostly women don't die of pregnancy and childbirth, yes. But the risk is significant. And that is why I think fathers may get a voice, but they don't get a veto, on the subject of keeping the baby or having an abortion.

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