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Wear Pink on Wednesday


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With two days left in North America and only one in Australia, I thought I would remind everyone of the 'Wear Pink' day on Wednesday February 27th.

 

This is a passive way to step up and say all bullying is unacceptable!!

 

Anti Bullying Day

 

Make sure you all wear your best pink shirt or whatever else you are willing to wear :D

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Probably the only joy of a suit & tie is that you can be as colourful with the tie as you like.  Pink & silver grey crosshatch design.  Made some people ask, which gave me an opening to discuss.

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I never went anywhere all day, so I didn't wear pink.  I seriously doubt that anyone would of known the purpose if I had.  It's like those magnet ribbons, you don't really pay attention to them.  Pink is already taken by the breast cancer thing though, and I don't want to support mammograms, considering they are dangerous in themselves.  I also don't like the Susan G. Komen organization, but that's another story.

 

I don't like bullying anyway, and I have stepped up before when I seen it happening.  The last kid wasn't gay, but I knew he was on the slow side, and I wasn't going to let some creep steal his wallet.  Amazing thing was, the kid who was trying to rob him threatened to call the police on me.  I told him he should.  Anyway, that's my means of campaigning against bullying.

 

If something is important then getting involved directly is always my favorite approach.   Being passive never appealed much to me.

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I never went anywhere all day, so I didn't wear pink.  I seriously doubt that anyone would of known the purpose if I had.  It's like those magnet ribbons, you don't really pay attention to them.  Pink is already taken by the breast cancer thing though, and I don't want to support mammograms, considering they are dangerous in themselves.  I also don't like the Susan G. Komen organization, but that's another story.

 

I don't like bullying anyway, and I have stepped up before when I seen it happening.  The last kid wasn't gay, but I knew he was on the slow side, and I wasn't going to let some creep steal his wallet.  Amazing thing was, the kid who was trying to rob him threatened to call the police on me.  I told him he should.  Anyway, that's my means of campaigning against bullying.

 

If something is important then getting involved directly is always my favorite approach.   Being passive never appealed much to me.

Deciding to wear pink isn't passive. I think it's more effective than trying to stop bullying one person at a time. Wearing pink is about reminding that it's wrong to be a bully (and I used every chance I got to explain that). Of course, stopping a bully from hurting someone less powerful than him is direct, at it doesn't often discourage other ppl from doing it.

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I have to disagree with the idea that wearing colors and ribbons isn't passive.  I don't think there is anything proactive about it, it's simply an attempt to display support for an idea or cause.  If bullying is going to be reduced or stopped it's going to take action on the part of individuals.  The same is true for breast cancer.   The author of the thread himself said it's a passive way to say bullying is unacceptable.  I don't know how much more passive you could get, the only requirement is to dress in something pink.  That doesn't even require saying anything.   I believe actually getting involved personally is a much more valuable investment than displaying something symbolic.  People fly the flag, but that doesn't contribute to the strength of the nation, people who get involved politically and militarily do.  One is passive, the other active.  I doubt that any bully is going to be deterred by the sight of a pink shirt.  He will be by the threat of a boot in his butt.

 

Not that I'm against passive displays, it's just not my chosen way of dealing with issues I find important.

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I suspect, with the adoption by other 'causes' - and the general absorption of 'rainbow' design/colour strips  into the mainstream - there has been a lessening of 'meaning behind' personal displays. 

 

The use of the Pink Triangle (Germany/Third Reich) is believed to be the foundation of the Pink/Gay association (and it was America which apparently gave the world Pink for a Girl and Blue for a Boy in the early 1900s - before that, most young children were in 'dresses' as a matter of course - hence the sometimes odd looking Victorian photos, and the retention of the 'Christening Dress'.)  It has been used to very good and stark effect in the past, especially with ACT UP, back when AIDS was being touted as The Gay Plague.

 

I also feel it may well be a generational thing - in that now there is less to 'reclaim' because there is less bigotry (although still some marginalisation in regard to various Governmental support agencies.)  One indicator of this is that, here in the UK, in four years' time it will be 50 years since the legalisation of gay men.  Before 1967, any gay activity was considered a criminal offense, punishable by a prison sentence and medical correction (the good old Edison Medicine - electro-shock therapy.)  Most gays under the age of 30 to 35 have little or no idea of that part of the Gay History, because it isn't part of any educational system - either sociological or historical.

 

So while I would consider myself more Stonewall than OUTRage, and agree with you regarding the use of active involvement, I can also see the power of conversation as an educational tool.  You can break eggs on the side of a bowl, or with the head of a sledgehammer.  It just depends on how you're feeling at the time.

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