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HOPINME

MY KIND OF LOVE:)

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i count every hour 
every minute
every second
to see your face
to touch your hand
to feel your skin
to see your delighted eyes
to see your smile:)
for just a second...
i just want to die after these 
i want to take my last breath from your smell
iwant to take my last look of your face
i want to have my last touch of your skin
i want to kiss your hand while dying,having your hand in my fist
just
let me die slowly...
concentrated in your eyes....
yes, i want this.

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First of all, welcome to GA. You've shared a very emotive poem. Love and death are strong subjects.

Feel free to visit the Poet's community here. Cheers

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    • By AC Benus
      .
      Poetry Prompt 6 – Elegy
       
      Let's Write a Tennyson-style Elegy!
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      'Tis better to have loved and lost
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      --------------------------------------------------
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    • By AC Benus
      Hi and Welcome! This is an open thread, intended for poets to help one another on GA. It's not tied to any one piece, but a forum where we can exchange ideas, get feedback on a project we're intending to post, or one that's already up.
       
      Questions and advice are always welcomed, so don't be shy about stopping by now and again to say 'hey.'
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