Jump to content

Writing World

  • entries
    1,888
  • comments
    6,057
  • views
    117,266

Contributors to this blog

About this blog

Featuring everything new and experienced authors need to develop creative and technical skills. Check out writing development articles, our Word of the Day, writing prompts, anthology opportunities and more!

Entries in this blog

Grammar Guide 23 - Apostrophes, Contractions, and the dreaded Its versus It's

Welcome to a new week for Grammar Guides!  This week is all about the humble apostrophes their main usages and the one of the most messed up set of words in the English language. Apostrophes are punctuation marks that are used in three primary ways: Contractions - uses an apostrophe to replace missing letters in combined words such as "They are" being replaced by "They're" To Show Possession - Uses an apostrophe to show ownership.  ex: The cat's ball.  The cats' balls.

Myr

Myr in Grammar Guide

Grammar Guide 22 - cApiTalizaTion

This week we talk about when to capitalize and when not to (in grammar, not in money). Capitalization is when you place the first letter of the word in uppercase and the rest of the letters in lowercase. ✅DO - First word of a sentence and every first word after a period, a question mark, or an exclamation point ✅DO - Proper nouns like "Statue of Liberty" 🗽 but ❌DON'T capitalize "the" preceding the proper nouns like "the Statue of Liberty"  ✅DO - days of the week

Myr

Myr in Grammar Guide

Grammar Guide 21 - The End of the Sentence

We are going to do a really simple Grammar Guide this week.  We're going to talk about the end of the sentence. There are three common ways to end a sentence.  A period. An exclamation point! A question mark? First up, the round dot at the end of your sentence is the period.  A period is used when the sentence states a fact or makes a command. Each sentence in this paragraph ends in a period. Next up, the question mark: ❓ Sentences that ask a question or display doubt e

Myr

Myr in Grammar Guide

Grammar Guide 20 - More on Sentences

This week we wrap up on construction of sentences.  Our first part talks about Parallel Construction in sentences. Parallel words, phrases, and clauses improve the flow of ideas and heighten its impact.  Similarity of form helps readers recognize similarity of content or function. Use consistent voice throughout sentence Ensure consistent voice (active or passive) and an introduction to each clause in a series Bad: Joey was worried that the exam would

Myr

Myr in Grammar Guide

Grammar Guide 19 - More Clauses

This week we go over even more clauses. This week we continue our discussion on clauses. Clauses can be categorized by whether or not they are necessary to the meaning of the noun in the sentence.  An essential clause, also called a defining clause or a restrictive clause is essential to the meaning of the noun in the sentence. Example:  The car that I just bought in the driveway. The restrictive clause, that I just bought, distinguishes the car from any and all others.  

Myr

Myr in Grammar Guide

Grammar Guide 18 - Clauses

Welcome to week 18 of our ongoing Grammar Guide.  This week we are going to chat about complex phrases, the Clause. A clause is a phrase with a subject and a verb and any complements the verb requires. Depending on the type of clause, it may or may not stand alone as a sentence.   Independent Clause - Expresses a complete thought.  Two or more independent Clauses can be joined together with a conjunction. Example 1: The shingles blew off the roof. Example 2: I put them i

Myr

Myr in Grammar Guide

Grammar Guide 17 - Phrases

Welcome to our 17th Grammar Guide!  This week we continue our coverage on sentences.  The topic for today is Phrases.  A phrase is a group of words that adds detail to a sentence but does not have its own subject or verb.  Phrases are parts of sentences, but cannot stand on their own. There are five types of phrases: Adjective Phrases - Phrases that give more detail about a noun, and they are usually found right after the word or words they modify. A few guys

Myr

Myr in Grammar Guide

Grammar Guide 16 - Complements

Complement - a word, phrase, or clause that is necessary to complete the meaning of a given expression. Complements help add meaning or a story to the subject and verb of a sentence, for example. There are five types of Complements: Direct Object - The direct object receives the action of the verb and is usually a noun or pronoun. Tip: Ask yourself "Who" or "What" to identify the direct object in a sentence. Billy drank lemonade. (Lemonade is the direct object

Myr

Myr in Grammar Guide

Grammar Guide 15 - Compound Subjects

This week we discuss the rules of thumb for dealing with Compound Subjects, especially in how they relate to last week's topic on Subject-Verb Agreement. Compound Subjects - Two or more individual nouns or noun phrases connected by "and" , "or", or "nor" to form a single, longer noun phrase.  They can cause confusion with the subject-verb agreement.  Example:  spaghetti and meatballs is a compound subject, but it is also considered a singular unit, and thus gets a singular verb. 

Myr

Myr in Grammar Guide

Grammar Guide 14 - Subject-Verb Agreement

Welcome to Grammar Guide 14!  This week we are discussing Subject and Verb Agreement.  In this day of endless agreements, isn't it good to know that we are focusing on making sure that our words are lining up properly? There is only one rule in Subject-Verb Agreement, but, being the English language, we need to make this complicated. Verbs must agree with subjects in number and in person. First up, we need to discuss Indefinite Pronouns. Each, everybody, everyone, everyth

Myr

Myr in Grammar Guide

Grammar Guide 13 - Subjects & Predicates

Last week we started to discuss sentences.  This week, we continue.  Sentences are made up of two parts.  Subjects and Predicates. Subjects - The person, place, or thing that is the topic of the setence-- along with the words that describe it. Predicate is what the person, place, or thing is doing or what condition it is in -- along with the words that modify it. Implied Subject - Imperative sentences often have an implied subject.  "Go fly a kite!"  The implied s

Myr

Myr in Grammar Guide

Grammar Guide 12 - Sentences

This week we dig deeper into the structure of writing: sentences. Sentence - made up of one or more words that express a complete thought in a statement, question, request, command, or exclamation Fragments - look like a complete sentence, but often does not complete a thought.  Often, these fragments are subordinate (or dependent ) clauses. Fragment Example:  Because he was tired. This is a subordinate clause that is an incomplete thought. Sentence: Because he was tired, the

Myr

Myr in Grammar Guide

Grammar Guide 11 - Interjections

Welcome to week 11 of our Grammar Guide.  This week is all about interjections.  Interjections typically show up in dialog. Interjections are used to express emotion such as surprise, displeasure and other strong emotions.   Interjections are typically abrupt as an aside or interruption and most often appear in dialog. Hey! Wow! Yuck! A strong interjection will typically have an exclamation point ! as punctuation.  However, you will see them with a period if the re

Myr

Myr in Grammar Guide

Grammar Guide 10 - Conjunctions

Welcome to tenth Grammar Guide!  This week we are going to be talking all about FANBOYS!  Well, Myr & Cia are working together to talk about conjunctions, but FANBOYS are part of it.  We'll get to that shortly. Conjunctions join two parts of a sentence together, and there are four types of conjunctions: Coordinating Conjunctions Coordinating Conjunctions - a conjunction placed between words, phrases, clauses, or sentences of equal rank. There are 7 of them and you c

Myr

Myr in Grammar Guide

Grammar Guide 9 - Prepositions

Welcome to our ninth week examining Grammar.  This week, we are hopping on Prepositions. Preposition - connects a noun or pronoun to another word in the sentence to show the relationship between the two.  It often indicates position such as: above, below, over, under, or beneath. Joey went up the stairs. ( up connects went and stairs) = verb and noun connected Sally sat in the corner. (in connects Sally and corner) = two nouns connected Ending Sentences with a Prepositi

Myr

Myr in Grammar Guide

Grammar Guide 8 - Regular vs Irregular Verbs

This week we are back to where the action is... verbs!  English is the Rube Goldberg Machine of languages and it has a lot of oddities.  One of those is this whole concept of regular vs irregular and verb forms. This also ties in with Grammar Guide 6's topic of Verb Tenses.  Be sure to check that out as well, if you missed it. Verbs have 5 Forms: Infinitive - the basic form of the verb ➡️ walk Simple Present - Used when the action is happening right now or or happ

Myr

Myr in Grammar Guide

Grammar Guide 7 - Point of View

Welcome to Week 7 of our Grammar Guide. This week is all about Point of View.  We aren't talking about the arguing thing though (thankfully).  We are looking at this in how it relates to rules of grammar and how it gets applied in writing.  First up, let's talk about the Grammar Point of View: Grammar has three points of view: First person - The speaker of the sentence (I/We) Second Person - The person spoken to (you) Third Person - The person or thing spoken about (he

Myr

Myr in Grammar Guide

Grammar Guide 6 - Verb Tenses

Welcome to the next topic in our fun Grammar Guide series. This week are are hopping into the fun world of English Verb Tenses.  English has three basic verb tenses: Past - actions that occurred in the past Present - actions that are occurring at the moment Future - actions that will occur in the future. In English, these 3 basic verb tenses each have 4 aspects and this means, (if you're keeping up with the math), 12 verb tenses. Simple - actions that ar

Myr

Myr in Grammar Guide

Grammar Guide 5 - Pronouns

Welcome back! Last week we covered Adverbs and had a great little chat. We also touched on a way to spot "Show vs Tell" using adverb tells. This week, we hit pronouns. A pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun, usually for added variety and to avoid repetition. Pronouns come in 8 different classifications, almost all of which make good "Words of the Day": Personal - represent people, places or things Examples: I, me, you, he, she, they, her, it, we, us

Myr

Myr in Grammar Guide

Grammar Guide 4 - Back to Basics - Adverbs

Last week we covered verbs, and now it is time for adverbs. Adverbs Adverbs tell us more about a verb, an adjective, or another adverb.  Most adverbs end in -ly, but not all of them. Some Common Adverbs that Don't End in -ly quite, now, very, fast, never, well Adverbs Answer Questions Examples: Adverbs modifying verbs The zombie staggered slowly towards the brains. Adverbs modifying adjectives Cats have very twitchy

Myr

Myr in Grammar Guide

Grammar Guide 3 - Back to Basics - Verbs

Welcome back to week 3 of Back to Basics!  Thank you for the great comments on our first two features! This week is all about the action (and everyone knows action sells)... verbs! Verbs are words that indicate action or states of being.  Types of Verbs Action Verbs - verbs that show movement or change. Billy jumped onto the wagon. Verbs of Being - verbs that express a state, usually a form of "to be" The boy was hungry.

Myr

Myr in Grammar Guide

Grammar Guide 2 - Back to Basics - Adjectives

Wow!  Thanks for all the replies on week 1!  Ready for Week 2 of the Grammar Guide?  This week is Back to Basics: Adjectives An adjective modifies a noun or pronoun to give more information about a person, place, or thing. Adjectives answer such things as:  which one? what kind? how many? There are few different kinds of adjectives: Articles Can be definite or indefinite and they point out or refer to a person, place, or thing Definite articl

Myr

Myr in Grammar Guide

Grammar Guide 1 - Back to Basics - Nouns

Welcome to a brand new weekly writing feature: Grammar Guide. If you are anything like me, you have probably not put much thought into the structure of language since you first learned it in the early days of your education.  (What used to be called grammar school).  As an adult now playing in the writing space, it has become a more pressing concern.  Understanding how things go together makes it easier to bend things to your will.  If you don't remember the terms Interrogatives, Articles,

Myr

Myr in Grammar Guide

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Our Privacy Policy can be found here: Privacy Policy. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..