Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
C James

Lovin' High Places by Marty

Recommended Posts

Discuss Marty's story "Lovin' High Places", in this thread. :)

 

 

 

Spoilers below!!!

 

 

 

 

 

Spoilers below!!!

 

 

 

 

 

Spoilers below!!!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

"Because it was there."

 

A philosophy that, unfortunately, I can't relate to. People do, and the characters in the story certainly did and it shows. I can appreciate the sentiment, because it is the one that underlies so many human achievements -- people doing things because they can, or because they took an obstacle as a challenge.

 

What I could relate to was the way the story ended. People do drift apart -- I have "friends" that I haven't seen for years, and others that our only contact seems to be exchanging Christmas cards. Settling down ties you down, too, but that's not always a bad thing. Giving up the freedom to move whenever you want is fine when you gain something you want in return. This is another thing in the story that I could strongly relate to.

 

I wasn't sure I would like the story when I started reading it. This is more because mountain climbing isn't something that interests me, but there are enough underlying messages of challenges, philosophy, dreams and reality that I found myself coming away with a melancholy smile on the face.

 

Thank you, Marty!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

I very much liked the inside look into the joy of climbing, a hobby that is quite foreign to me. How sad that they drifted apart, and disappointing that attempted contact was ignored. All too realistic though.

 

Thanks for a great story, Marty!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

Do they actually let the English live in Ireland? :P

 

I have spent a total of four weeks in Ireland. I loved every moment. :wub: It is indeed the Emerald Isle, utterly beautiful. And the people are 'grand'. Your vivid descriptions of the various landscapes brought back so many great memories.

 

I have to agree with Maddy. In terms of the relationship between the narrator and Sam, it is a story for those given to melancholy, as least as much as the phrase what might have been would allow.

 

I believe that the narrator's reference to the isolation of the mountains spoke volumes to how he preferred to live his life. Just as the 'Creator' belief intruded upon his far more rational 'Life-Force' belief, so did Sam intrude upon his isolated self. Both were welcomed intrusions.

 

If there is a regret in his life, it would be Sam.

 

Well done, Marty. :worship:

 

Conner

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

A bittersweet short story I enjoyed. The fact that the pronoun "we" is used for a good part; the epiphany walking up the mountain, then the argument, this simple little episode that seems to be pinpointed as the beginning of the drifting apart. I don't know if this story intends to make a point, but I like the nostalgia and the joy mixed in it.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

The ending was so sad! :( Why did he left? Losing his friend as well as his passion. Unfortunately, it's the bitter truth of many of us. *sigh* Sad and realistic story. But also a well-written and nice one.

 

Ieshwar

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
On 7/14/2007 at 12:15 PM, Graeme said:

"Because it was there."

 

A philosophy that, unfortunately, I can't relate to. People do, and the characters in the story certainly did and it shows. I can appreciate the sentiment, because it is the one that underlies so many human achievements -- people doing things because they can, or because they took an obstacle as a challenge.

 

What I could relate to was the way the story ended. People do drift apart -- I have "friends" that I haven't seen for years, and others that our only contact seems to be exchanging Christmas cards. Settling down ties you down, too, but that's not always a bad thing. Giving up the freedom to move whenever you want is fine when you gain something you want in return. This is another thing in the story that I could strongly relate to.

 

I wasn't sure I would like the story when I started reading it. This is more because mountain climbing isn't something that interests me, but there are enough underlying messages of challenges, philosophy, dreams and reality that I found myself coming away with a melancholy smile on the face.

 

Thank you, Marty!

 

I really must apologise for taking over 11 years to actually spot this thread! 😮

 

Thanks for the review, Graeme. And thanks also @C James for starting it. :thumbup:

 

I'm glad that you found something in the story to make you smile, even though the setting (mountain climbing) doesn't really interest you. That leaves me feeling that I must have at least done something right when I was writing it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
On 7/15/2007 at 10:20 PM, C James said:

I very much liked the inside look into the joy of climbing, a hobby that is quite foreign to me. How sad that they drifted apart, and disappointing that attempted contact was ignored. All too realistic though.

 

Thanks for a great story, Marty!

 

Thanks for the kind words, CJ.

 

And, yes, it is sad that they drifted apart but, as you so rightly say, that really is one of the realities of life at times.

Share this post


Link to post
On 7/20/2007 at 1:34 AM, Conner said:

Do they actually let the English live in Ireland? :P

 

I have spent a total of four weeks in Ireland. I loved every moment. :wub: It is indeed the Emerald Isle, utterly beautiful. And the people are 'grand'. Your vivid descriptions of the various landscapes brought back so many great memories.

 

I have to agree with Maddy. In terms of the relationship between the narrator and Sam, it is a story for those given to melancholy, as least as much as the phrase what might have been would allow.

 

I believe that the narrator's reference to the isolation of the mountains spoke volumes to how he preferred to live his life. Just as the 'Creator' belief intruded upon his far more rational 'Life-Force' belief, so did Sam intrude upon his isolated self. Both were welcomed intrusions.

 

If there is a regret in his life, it would be Sam.

 

Well done, Marty. :worship:

 

Conner

 

A very belated thank you for your reply, Conner. :)

 

You may well be correct in suggesting that "the narrator's reference to the isolation of the mountains spoke volumes to how he preferred to live his life." But I'm not so sure that Sam's relationship with the narrator would have been considered an "intrusion." Nor do I think it likely that the narrator would ever regret having let Sam into his life

Share this post


Link to post
On 7/20/2007 at 6:22 PM, Bondwriter said:

A bittersweet short story I enjoyed. The fact that the pronoun "we" is used for a good part; the epiphany walking up the mountain, then the argument, this simple little episode that seems to be pinpointed as the beginning of the drifting apart. I don't know if this story intends to make a point, but I like the nostalgia and the joy mixed in it.

 

Thanks for the kind words, Bondwriter, and my apologies for taking so long to respond.

 

I must admit that I am not sure what you mean when you mention the argument... The conversation between the narrator and Sam was certainly not meant to sound like an argument when I was actually writing the piece.

 

And I have to admit that I'm not even sure myself as to whether I was trying to make a point with the story! 😉

Share this post


Link to post
On 7/20/2007 at 6:56 PM, Ieshwar said:

The ending was so sad! :( Why did he left? Losing his friend as well as his passion. Unfortunately, it's the bitter truth of many of us. *sigh* Sad and realistic story. But also a well-written and nice one.

 

Ieshwar

 

Thanks, @Ieshwar! It's always good to get praise from someone who writes such great short stories himself. :)

 

The narrator may have lost (or at least given up) his passion for climbing mountains, but perhaps he gained another one when he bought the smallholding?

 

And as for losing his friend, well, as you intimate, that's all part of life. Life is full of its ups and downs. We just have to learn to accept the downs along with the ups...

 

Edited by Marty

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Our Privacy Policy can be found here. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..