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Circumnavigation (99+32) Anchors Aweigh

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Anchors Aweigh is up. Posted Image

 

Sorry for the dealy, and hopefully, that was the last delay. :)

 

(BTW, there may be a dealy of about 30 seconds between this post appearing and the chapter appearing).

 

The voyaging begins again.

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bad idea to sail back to america ... bridget is near there ... and if they do charters ... they will run into her and not know it

now the question is will trevor talk to mr G .. and give him all the evidence?

 

wow its time to go home? will trevor make good byes and call his mom during his voyage

he hasn't spoken to jim since chrismas

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bad idea to sail back to america ... bridget is near there ... and if they do charters ... they will run into her and not know it

now the question is will trevor talk to mr G .. and give him all the evidence?

 

wow its time to go home? will trevor make good byes and call his mom during his voyage

he hasn't spoken to jim since chrismas

 

Nothing to worry about; he's not sailing back to America, exactly. He did speak to Jim (we don't see everything that happens, so this one we just saw the results of) and due to Shane's immigration issue, they are moving to the Bahamas. That's one of the reasons Lisa and Joel are going there; to find Trevor and Shane a place. (plus they'll be running charters out of the Bahamas).

 

See? No worries. :)

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Today was a great Tuesday morning - the latest chapter was there when I open up my computer. And things are coming together - like two nearly identical catamarans rafting off Australia's western shore.

 

Even as things seemingly were falling into place, there was the odd press conference and the writer-editor conversation. Things in Australia and the Caribbean are far from being resolved. Bridgit, while mentioned in this chapter but not "seen", is still doing sneaky stuff which is sure to threaten Trevor and Shane.

 

Thanks, CJ, for the good read.

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Posted Image ....... Well we still don't know about Craig, wonder if he did any snooping while aboard the Kookaburra?

 

“Will do,” Trevor replied, glancing nervously ashore. “We’ll lock up and come ashore, but I’ll need to run a line to something solid and tie off, I don’t want Kookaburra drifting –”

“No worries, Trev. Just follow me. Craig’s here, he’ll take care of the boat. Just try to enjoy the day. There are tons of people who would like to meet you. If you let yourself, you’ll have a blast,” Fowler said.

 

It was great to see how excited Trevor got after taking the Atlantis out for the test runs, Ned did a superb job on rebuilding her. Hmmm, no mention of the tape to Fowler, just as well it is kept secret for now. But I suspect we will hear from Bridget soon, once the asset list becomes public knowledge. Jim should get Trevor's package very soon, I wonder if he'll have the FBI seize the boxes before Bridget's people can get to them. Great chapter CJ Posted Image

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Not so sure I would be a hurry to put my name on a front page article listing the assets... Lets hope Kent Moorcroft heeds his editors initial advise! It will be interesting to see how CJ melds the Jason Kline book and Trevor and Shanes anticipated stop in Melbourne. I wonder if Gray will reappear?

 

I could almost feel the wind in my hair and the excitement that was described when the catamaran started to heel at 25 knots. What a tremendous accident though if the hull did a nose dive... I still can't fathom how CJ's mind must work... He is like an expert on everything from insurance, aerospace, to law and medicine not to mention sailing! Not bad for a guy living in the desert.

 

I'm glad the secret compartment is up and running, lets soon hope the asset list will reside here along with the Makarov and Trevors gun whenever he gets it back. My stainless though is not magnetic. Our refrigerator magnets don't hold at all, perhaps this is some special seaworthy stainless with a bit more iron, less nickel? Perhaps our expert will let us know...

 

 

I sure hope we get to see this on the big screen. I may be jaded but this really is the best/most fun and spell binding novel I have had the pleasure to read in a long long time! Thanks again CJ for all the hard work, we certainly appreciate it...Posted Image

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I still can't fathom how CJ's mind must work... He is like an expert on everything from insurance, aerospace, to law and medicine not to mention sailing! Not bad for a guy living in the desert.

 

I'm glad the secret compartment is up and running, lets soon hope the asset list will reside here along with the Makarov and Trevors gun whenever he gets it back. My stainless though is not magnetic. Our refrigerator magnets don't hold at all, perhaps this is some special seaworthy stainless with a bit more iron, less nickel? Perhaps our expert will let us know...

 

 

Posted Image ................Actually CJ lives in the mountains of Arizona and near cliffs!! Posted Image I didn't notice the stainless steel connection, but didn't Ned say that there was a 2nd magnet that needed to be activated to pop it open or keep it closed and that the magnet had to be placed precisely between the 2 rivets higher up to activate?

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Normally, stainless steel has a little magnetism, but classicaly if you work it (machine it, form it using a press, etc) the basic magnetism of the iron re inserts itself. In the UK , a classic example is a stainless sheet on a frig is not magnetic, but a sink where the metal has been formed is. But the common trick is to place a magnet behind the sheet. this works but not as well as black iron (raw iron)

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Today was a great Tuesday morning - the latest chapter was there when I open up my computer. And things are coming together - like two nearly identical catamarans rafting off Australia's western shore.

 

Even as things seemingly were falling into place, there was the odd press conference and the writer-editor conversation. Things in Australia and the Caribbean are far from being resolved. Bridgit, while mentioned in this chapter but not "seen", is still doing sneaky stuff which is sure to threaten Trevor and Shane.

 

Thanks, CJ, for the good read.

 

Yes indeed, things are far from being resolved. However, Trevor and Shane are somewhat safe for the moment - as long as Bridget doesn't find out he's found and seen the tape. Otherwise, she'll probably be happy to wait until he's more conveniently located. I guess it's a perhaps not a good thing he and Shane are moving to the Bahamas to run charters, but he's not worried. :)

 

Posted Image ....... Well we still don't know about Craig, wonder if he did any snooping while aboard the Kookaburra?

 

“Will do,” Trevor replied, glancing nervously ashore. “We’ll lock up and come ashore, but I’ll need to run a line to something solid and tie off, I don’t want Kookaburra drifting –”

“No worries, Trev. Just follow me. Craig’s here, he’ll take care of the boat. Just try to enjoy the day. There are tons of people who would like to meet you. If you let yourself, you’ll have a blast,” Fowler said.

 

It was great to see how excited Trevor got after taking the Atlantis out for the test runs, Ned did a superb job on rebuilding her. Hmmm, no mention of the tape to Fowler, just as well it is kept secret for now. But I suspect we will hear from Bridget soon, once the asset list becomes public knowledge. Jim should get Trevor's package very soon, I wonder if he'll have the FBI seize the boxes before Bridget's people can get to them. Great chapter CJ Posted Image

 

We'll definitely hear from Bridget soon, but don't worry, she's well and happy. :)

 

Not so sure I would be a hurry to put my name on a front page article listing the assets... Lets hope Kent Moorcroft heeds his editors initial advise! It will be interesting to see how CJ melds the Jason Kline book and Trevor and Shanes anticipated stop in Melbourne. I wonder if Gray will reappear?

 

I could almost feel the wind in my hair and the excitement that was described when the catamaran started to heel at 25 knots. What a tremendous accident though if the hull did a nose dive... I still can't fathom how CJ's mind must work... He is like an expert on everything from insurance, aerospace, to law and medicine not to mention sailing! Not bad for a guy living in the desert.

 

I'm glad the secret compartment is up and running, lets soon hope the asset list will reside here along with the Makarov and Trevors gun whenever he gets it back. My stainless though is not magnetic. Our refrigerator magnets don't hold at all, perhaps this is some special seaworthy stainless with a bit more iron, less nickel? Perhaps our expert will let us know...

 

 

I sure hope we get to see this on the big screen. I may be jaded but this really is the best/most fun and spell binding novel I have had the pleasure to read in a long long time! Thanks again CJ for all the hard work, we certainly appreciate it...Posted Image

 

I figured that the counter-top would be metalurgically similar to a stainless steel sink, which has a somewhat higher iron content and lower nickel content than decorative stainless (which is usually higher in nickle and chromium). To be honest, I wasn;t sure, so I used a selinium-cobalt high power magnet (much like Trevor's powerful speaker magnet that he's using for that soap dish base) ant tested it on my sinks. On both, I did get some magnetic attraction, though far less than plain steel. It'd be enough to keep a soap dish in place, but Ned's solution of routering a slight depression in the stainless is best.

 

BTW, I'm more of a jack of all trades (though in actuality far from all), and thus master of non, than an expert in anything. :) As for sailing, I am not an expert. I've only been on yachts a few times. The story does show the hand of an expert when it comes to sailing, but it's not me. That's Red-A, a real expert on things nautical, including of course yachting.

 

Posted Image ................Actually CJ lives in the mountains of Arizona and near cliffs!! Posted Image I didn't notice the stainless steel connection, but didn't Ned say that there was a 2nd magnet that needed to be activated to pop it open or keep it closed and that the magnet had to be placed precisely between the 2 rivets higher up to activate?

 

ACK! Slander!!! I'd never go anywhere near a cliff!

 

the magnet has to be precisely placed, but just one. If it's dragged around, it raises the second arm, which locks the mechanism. (think of the arm as being attached to hollow centered metal square; unless the magnet is in the center, it'll attract some part of that square, raising the locker arm into place. Ned had a good idea there.

 

Normally, stainless steel has a little magnetism, but classicaly if you work it (machine it, form it using a press, etc) the basic magnetism of the iron re inserts itself. In the UK , a classic example is a stainless sheet on a frig is not magnetic, but a sink where the metal has been formed is. But the common trick is to place a magnet behind the sheet. this works but not as well as black iron (raw iron)

 

I'll be honest, I never thought to test the refrigerator grade stuff, just my stainless sinks, way back when the secret compartment first introduced. I just hope Trevor's countertop is more like my sinks than like the stuff found on refrigerators, dishwasher fascias, etc.

 

CJ :)

 

And BTW, before I forget, the title of the coming (on time for once!) chapter is "Tickling the Dragon's Tail".

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Two quick nautical corrections. When a sailboat tips to one side because of the pressure of the wind, it is called "heeling," not "listing." A listing boat is a boat in trouble because it's natural balance is gone, as when it is filling with water which collects on one side or the other and tips it to the side. Listing is bad, heeling is good.

 

The second one (and I am not altogether certain about this one ) is the expression "Sails flying." This would mean that the sheets (ropes that control the sails) were released, not that all the sails were pulling to the max, as seems to be the intended meaning in this chapter. However, the more common expression is "sheets flying." Letting fly the sheets was considered a distress signal in the old days. There is also something called a "flying sail," but that is a sail that is not permanently mounted on the normal spars. These are sails such as a spinnaker, a flying jib, or, on square riggers and schooners, a "flying topsail." (On gaff rigged schooners there was a sail called a"Gollywobbler," a sail that was hoisted on a temporary spar above one or more of the gaffs, depending on how many masts were involved.)

 

By and large, though, I love the accuracy of the technical sailing details in this story. In that, it almost comes up to the standards of such nautical adventures as the Horatio Hornblower by CS Forester and the Aubrey/Maturin chronicals by O'Brian. Really good work!

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Two quick nautical corrections. When a sailboat tips to one side because of the pressure of the wind, it is called "heeling," not "listing." A listing boat is a boat in trouble because it's natural balance is gone, as when it is filling with water which collects on one side or the other and tips it to the side. Listing is bad, heeling is good.

 

The second one (and I am not altogether certain about this one ) is the expression "Sails flying." This would mean that the sheets (ropes that control the sails) were released, not that all the sails were pulling to the max, as seems to be the intended meaning in this chapter. However, the more common expression is "sheets flying." Letting fly the sheets was considered a distress signal in the old days. There is also something called a "flying sail," but that is a sail that is not permanently mounted on the normal spars. These are sails such as a spinnaker, a flying jib, or, on square riggers and schooners, a "flying topsail." (On gaff rigged schooners there was a sail called a"Gollywobbler," a sail that was hoisted on a temporary spar above one or more of the gaffs, depending on how many masts were involved.)

 

By and large, though, I love the accuracy of the technical sailing details in this story. In that, it almost comes up to the standards of such nautical adventures as the Horatio Hornblower by CS Forester and the Aubrey/Maturin chronicals by O'Brian. Really good work!

 

In a monohull I would agree wholehaertingly with you that heeling is the term when the wind is pushing the boat over. And agree with you that generally heeling is good Listing is BAD. And therefore I think listing is the term in a cat which is not designed to have a heel. I have not been on a cat that big which has gone mono, I do not know any body that mad (whoops keen), but my experience definitely says list (BAD) is the right word.

 

sails flying, yes the correct term would be sails set, but this is where CJ magic comes in that sails flying is more descriptive and not incorrect. I have never heard of a sail call flying sail. Flying jib, flying topsail yes. Flying describing that there is no boom or mast or rigid object attached to the sail. "Let Fly" or let sheets fly is the common expression to let go of the sheets (ropes that go to the rear end of a sail) so you can have flying sheets.

 

Now I have used a Gollywobbler, and I believe it is a very approppiate name. But this was on a two masted schooner, and it was a four sided ballon (spinaker type) sail set from the top of the masts and going down the deck, and the foremast sail was not use. As it was held only by the four corners, it was very unstable. "expletive deleted it wobbles about" But this was in the west country, and they do have some peculiar terms.

Now I wonder where I heard "Gallopping Girty!

Edited by Red_A

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Two quick nautical corrections. When a sailboat tips to one side because of the pressure of the wind, it is called "heeling," not "listing." A listing boat is a boat in trouble because it's natural balance is gone, as when it is filling with water which collects on one side or the other and tips it to the side. Listing is bad, heeling is good.

 

The second one (and I am not altogether certain about this one ) is the expression "Sails flying." This would mean that the sheets (ropes that control the sails) were released, not that all the sails were pulling to the max, as seems to be the intended meaning in this chapter. However, the more common expression is "sheets flying." Letting fly the sheets was considered a distress signal in the old days. There is also something called a "flying sail," but that is a sail that is not permanently mounted on the normal spars. These are sails such as a spinnaker, a flying jib, or, on square riggers and schooners, a "flying topsail." (On gaff rigged schooners there was a sail called a"Gollywobbler," a sail that was hoisted on a temporary spar above one or more of the gaffs, depending on how many masts were involved.)

 

By and large, though, I love the accuracy of the technical sailing details in this story. In that, it almost comes up to the standards of such nautical adventures as the Horatio Hornblower by CS Forester and the Aubrey/Maturin chronicals by O'Brian. Really good work!

 

Thanks!!!

 

I do take liberties on the wording. I favored list over heel because most readers know what a list is, not so with heeling. I did check on this and there seemed to be enough gray area that I could get away with it, though I do freely admit that there's a strong argument the other way as well.

 

The problem is I can't just use sailing terms (or any technical terms) without explanations of some sort, and those explanations distort the flow. One example would be that I dare not use a term such as "angle of loll" in passing because a non-sailor would have no clue, and the explanation is a bit lengthy.

 

Sails flying is of course not technically accurate, but then again neither is flying a flag. However, both are useful and evocative descriptors.

 

If there are misused words, it's due to me choosing clarity over accuracy, so please don't think that any such errors are a reflection on Red, they aren't. . Posted Image

 

In a monohull I would agree wholehaertingly with you that heeling is the term when the wind is pushing the boat over. And agree with you that generally heeling is good Listing is BAD. And therefore I think listing is the term in a cat which is not designed to have a heel. I have not been on a cat that big which has gone mono, I do not know any body that mad (whoops keen), but my experience definitely says list (BAD) is the right word.

 

sails flying, yes the correct term would be sails set, but this is where CJ magic comes in that sails flying is more descriptive and not incorrect. I have never heard of a sail call flying sail. Flying jib, flying topsail yes. Flying describing that there is no boom or mast or rigid object attached to the sail. "Let Fly" or let sheets fly is the common expression to let go of the sheets (ropes that go to the rear end of a sail) so you can have flying sheets.

 

Now I have used a Gollywobbler, and I believe it is a very approppiate name. But this was on a two masted schooner, and it was a four sided ballon (spinaker type) sail set from the top of the masts and going down the deck, and the foremast sail was not use. As it was held only by the four corners, it was very unstable. "expletive deleted it wobbles about" But this was in the west country, and they do have some peculiar terms.

Now I wonder where I heard "Gallopping Girty!

 

Sailing sure has some odd terms. Gollywobbler... well, at least it's descriptive. Posted Image

 

As for being on a big cat that has gone mono... me neither, but I've been on a little hobie cat and gone mono. The term I used at the time wasn't list or heel, but YEEEEHAAAAAAAH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

:)

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I shake my head and smile reading the forum. It's not as good at CJ story, but it comes close. What a cool experience this has been to see a massive, complicated and toally engaging story come into focus. It's also a privilege. Thanks, CJ.

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I had a little racing cat when I was a boy - probably 15 or 16. We called it "heeling" and getting one of the hulls up was, er, "up on one". When we were standing on the monohull that was in the air, and trying to hold the boat from going over, that's "hiking" or "hiking out". The boat had hike straps for passengers and I had a little trapeze thing that I'd put around me to hike out. When I had it up on one I generally stood on the "up" monohull and leaned waaay out.

 

The goal was never to get up on one, though, as you mention it makes the boat really unstable and steering gets hard (I had an extender on the rudder, but the way it worked it screwed with the way the rudder reacted).

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I shake my head and smile reading the forum. It's not as good at CJ story, but it comes close. What a cool experience this has been to see a massive, complicated and toally engaging story come into focus. It's also a privilege. Thanks, CJ.

 

Thanks!

 

It's been quite a journey for me too; I never imagined that it would be as long as it is, and I have to say, I'll miss the world of Circumnavigation when it's done.

 

And I very much love this forum; it's pure fun for me. :)

 

I had a little racing cat when I was a boy - probably 15 or 16. We called it "heeling" and getting one of the hulls up was, er, "up on one". When we were standing on the monohull that was in the air, and trying to hold the boat from going over, that's "hiking" or "hiking out". The boat had hike straps for passengers and I had a little trapeze thing that I'd put around me to hike out. When I had it up on one I generally stood on the "up" monohull and leaned waaay out.

 

The goal was never to get up on one, though, as you mention it makes the boat really unstable and steering gets hard (I had an extender on the rudder, but the way it worked it screwed with the way the rudder reacted).

 

That's what I did; leaned way out to try to keep it from going over. In smooth water, with one hull just barely touching the water, that little Hobbie would really fly (I managed that for about five seconds), but as the hull raised, wind spilled and it'd get really tricky (I was not an experienced Hobie sailor, so I made plenty of goofs, including, shall we say, ending up in a catamaran's stable-2 position. I used to race Lasers as well, and owned one, so the Hobie was a blast; what a difference!

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I had a little racing cat when I was a boy

 

I read that in completely the wrong way...

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