Jump to content
  • Members Can Sign Up For Content Notifications

    Do you want to be automatically notified of updates to your favorite content?  Join now for free and follow your favorite stuff!

WOOF - 2. Planting Seeds

I wiggled in the airplane seat, trying to find a comfortable position. Apollo had mauled my ass before driving me to the airport, and it felt as if his lamppost of a dick was still inside me. The man was hung.

We had progressed from workout buddies to casual friends and after a gym planning lunch, we ended up in bed. We repeated the afternoon a few times over the subsequent months. It was now April, and the previous night he had spent at my place, so he could drive me out to Newark Airport this morning. He was the big spoon all night, and I woke up to him sliding his lubed cock back inside me.

We had talked about it and knew it would be our last time. It wasn’t due to his size, I knew I could get used to it if we went at it often enough. The problem was he being a total top. My versatility did not move him to spread his legs, and I was in no way interested in being anyone’s full-time bottom. We agreed to remain friends and continue working towards our common goal.

After our initial meeting, subsequent workouts, and our afternoon romp, we decided to investigate what was involved in opening our own place. If nothing else, we wanted showers where faulty plumbing and weird growths on tiles did not drive us nuts. By the time I left for Iowa, we had a good handle on requirements. While away, I would work on financial details while Apollo tried to find a location.

 

 

“Damn, Colt. You’re huge!” Jonathan Mann, a big man himself, wrapped the younger one in a hug. “It’s good to have you home, son.”

“Language, Jonathan. You shouldn’t be cussing in public. Welcome home, Colton.” Martha Mann was one of the few people who used Colt’s full name.

“You should see my workout partner. He’s a heck of a lot bigger than I am. Hi, Pa. How are you, Ma?” Colt bent and kissed his mother. He always wondered how such a small woman could have carried him inside her. Colt had weighed over ten pounds at birth.

Pa pointed at the duffle bag slung over my shoulder. “How much more luggage do you have?”

“This is it. Shorts, jeans, and t-shirts, I didn’t think I’d need a suit to work around the farm.” Over Christmas, I’d emptied out the closet in my old bedroom and donated most of the old clothing still in there. Mostly high school relics, everything was too small for me.

“Good, I hate waiting around baggage claim. New boots?”

Looking at my feet, I nodded. “My old ones gave out a while back. Bought these a month or so ago.” Walking around New York City in Timberlands was a fashion statement for many; for me, it was a way of avoiding blisters on long days tramping through the fields.

“Hope they’re broke in. There won’t be any wussing out because your feet hurt.”

Ma chuckled at his comment. “Remember your senior year in high school? You could barely walk after you insisted on wearing new ones right out of the store and going straight out to the fields.”

“I learned my lesson, Ma. I learned my lesson.”

As usual, Ma insisted on sitting in the back, while Pa and I shared the front seat of his old truck. I noticed the tires were still worn and once on the road, the rattling exhaust system unnerved me. They had refused my offer to buy them another one over Christmas. I decided not to give them a choice this time. I’d make time to visit the Chevy dealership tomorrow and force a new one on them. My parents did well but had a typical Midwestern frugality that drove me bonkers. I normally accepted it but not this time. I was concerned about their safety.

“Is this workout partner the man you’re going into business with?” Pa turned down the radio as we headed away from the airport; we had over an hour’s drive to the farm.

“Yeah. Apollo’s been guiding my time at the gym. And I’ve been eating better too. What with not having to spend so many hours at the office, I have time to shop and cook.”

“You said he’s from Greece?” Ma had always made it a point of getting to know everything she could about the people I met.

“His grandparents were, but he and his parents were all born in New York. That reminds me. Open my bag, Ma. He sent something for you guys.” I turned in my seat and pointed at a white, cardboard box I’d placed atop my clothes. “There’s baklava in there.”

“What’s that?”

“It’s a Mediterranean pastry. Flaky dough, chopped nuts, all covered in honey. Wait until you try it. It’s delicious. We can have it for dessert tonight.”

“How long does it last? Will it go bad if we don’t eat it tonight?”

The question surprised me. Ma had a sweet tooth, and it was unlike her to delay biting into something like this. “Not sure… I’ve kept some for like a week, and it was still good.”

“Perfect!” She sounded excited. “We’ll save them for the weekend.”

That was confusing. “Really? How come?”

“I talked to Sam’s mother a couple of days ago. When I mentioned you were coming to help with the soybean planting, she said she would like to see you. I invited them all over for dinner.”

My stomach lurched. “Sam’s parents? Him too? Why’d you do that, Ma?” I had made it a point of avoiding the Hooke family during my annual visits. “I’m not sure I want to be there.”

“Colton! Why would you say that? They always ask about you. You’ve never even met their granddaughter. We don’t understand why you avoid Sam whenever you’re in town. You and him were inseparable in high school.”

Now I was angry, and it showed in my voice. “Because he’s an asshole!”

“Language. I don’t care

“Fuck language, Ma.” My father may have taken his foot off the gas for a moment when he looked at me with a shocked expression. “I don’t give a shit. And if you can’t handle it, I’ll be fine with turning around and heading back home right now.”

My mother was definitely startled by my outburst, but it was my father who responded. “This is your home, Colt. Always was and always will be.”

“Sorry, Pa. But New York’s my home. The two of you are the only reason I return to Iowa now and then. Just because I wanted to get my hands dirty this spring doesn’t mean I’m coming back permanently. How many times do I have to say it? I don’t want to be a farmer.”

I was agitated and had raised my voice. It wasn’t something I did often, particularly around my parents. Ever since graduating from the University of Iowa, they had tried to convince me to move back, and eventually take over the family farm.

Ma broke the momentary silence. “But why, Colton? Even if you don’t want to be a farmer, why do you avoid Sam whenever you visit?”

The hurt and anger I’d bottled up for years exploded out of me. I again turned to stare at my mother and let her have it. “Because I’m gay and Sam told me he couldn’t be around a fag, okay? I have no use for anyone who refuses to accept me for who I am. As far as I’m concerned he can drop dead tomorrow, and I wouldn’t miss him.”

I watched my mother stare at her lap and heard a few sobs escape her. Looking out the windshield again, I slumped in my seat. After my sophomore year in college, I came home for the summer and came out to my parents. They took it surprisingly well and told me I was their son and they would always love me. But they never discussed the issue again. Even when I tried to.

“I’m gay, Ma. Have always been and will always be. I’m not going to hide who I am because it’s inconvenient. I bet you’re still telling people I’m single because I haven’t found the right one.” Typical small-town attitude to sweep what was not pleasant under the rug. “You lie to every one as much as you want. I won’t play that game. If you’re so ashamed of me you can go screw yourself.” Pa flinched and gave me a hard stare. Me cussing in front of Ma was unheard off.

“Pa, turn the truck around. This was a mistake. I thought I could come here, lend a hand, and spend a little time trying to get my shit together.” Back in December, my visit had been short and I was not yet ready to deal with my failed relationship and the other changes in my life. “Obviously, that’s not going to happen. I’ll get a room at a hotel and catch the next flight out of this shit hole.”

“Colt”Pa reached over and placed a hand on my thigh“Breathe, boy. Let’s all relax, okay?” He took a quick glance at my mother before returning his attention to the road. “Ma, I think you need to call Sam’s mother and cancel dinner. It seems there are things we didn’t know about her son.”

“You have no fucking idea.” My snippy comment earned me a hard glare from my father, but he did not pursue the subject.

“What do I tell her?” Ma was no longer trying to hide her sobbing. “What will they think?”

That did it. My temporary calm evaporated. “I don’t give a flying shit what you tell her! And I don’t care what anyone thinks. Fuck ’em all!” I may have at last crossed a line.

“ENOUGH!” Pa slammed on the breaks, and if I’d not been belted in, I would have probably flown through the windshield. He pulled to the side of the road, shut off the engine, and turned his full attention to me. “Colt, this is obviously something that’s been bothering you for a long time. I’m sorry Sam rejected you, and I’m sorry we did not know. You should have told us. But you’re my son, and I don’t care if you’re gay or a Martian. I love you. That boy was an idiot, and he’ll hear it from me next time I see him.”

Ma made a noise as if she was choking on her own spit. I stared out the window at the empty fields by the highway.

“I’m not turning around. I’m glad you’re here, and I want you to stay.” Pa waited until I nodded.

“Fine.” I didn’t say another word the rest of the trip. Neither did my parents.

Instead of a homecoming celebration, supper was a somber affair. Stilted conversation and uncomfortable silences left me second-guessing my decision to visit again. After helping clear the table and loading the dishwasher, I stepped outside and sat on the porch swing. Pa joined me a few minutes later.

“I guess today didn’t go as any of us expected.” Pa tapped down the tobacco in his pipe, struck a wooden match against the siding, and held the flame to the bowl. The fragrant, blueish smoke enveloped us, bringing back memories of sitting on his lap when I was a kid.

“Yeah, you could say that.” I locked eyes with him and watched as he smirked.

“Don’t worry about your mother. I’ll talk to her and make sure she cancels that stupid dinner. What do you plan to do tomorrow?”

That confused me. “Not sure what you mean, Pa. It’s up to you. I came out to work.”

“Well, we won’t be ready to go out on the fields for a few days. I plan on heading into town with Daniel tomorrow morning. We need a few things and there’s a part we ordered for the tractor that should be at the dealership.”

“Tell you what, I’ll go with Daniel. Ma’s probably asleep already, so you won’t get a chance to talk to her tonight. Do it tomorrow after I’m gone.” This was my chance to look for a new truck for them.

 

 

Ma was at the stove stirring eggs in her cast iron pan, and Pa sat at the kitchen table sipping coffee and reading the paper when I walked into the kitchen the following day. “Good morning.” Kissing Ma on the cheek, I poured myself a mug and sat across from my father.

Glancing at me, he did a double take when he noticed my shirt. He shook his head and smirked. “Trying to make a point?”

I smiled and nodded. The shirt was something I had picked up for pride the previous year. It read I’m not gay but my boyfriend is. “I don’t ever want to have another conversation like yesterday’s. Once someone sees me in town, word will spread. That will hopefully put an end to speculation.” Gossip in a small rural town traveled faster than corn grew in summer. Those who had an issue with my sexual orientation could go fuck themselves as far as I was concerned.

On purpose, I kept my voice down not wanting to deal with any of Ma’s comments until after Pa talked to her. She did not appear to notice the t-shirt when she handed us each a plate of eggs and bacon and placed another one stacked with toast on the table.

“Eat,” she said while wiping her hands with a kitchen towel. “Do you need anything washed, Colton? I’m going to do laundry.”

“No, thanks, Ma. One of the things I want to get while in town’s a new set of overalls. Those I’d like to wash before I wear them.”

“Toss them down in the basement whenever you get back.” The roar of a motorcycle made all three of us look up. “That’s Daniel. Offer him a cup of coffee before you leave.” She headed downstairs without looking back. I knew she was still trying to process my multiple outbursts from the previous day.

Pa did as she suggested as soon as our visitor knocked on the screen door. “Come in, Daniel. Have a cup of coffee while Colt finishes up.”

“Morning, Mr. Mann. Hey, Colt. Good to have you back, man. I hear you’re gonna get dirty with me.” The man smiled while stretching a scrunchie to tie his hair back. The long, black mane, copper skin tone, and slightly flared nose gave away his Native American heritage.

“That’s the plan. I haven’t played in the fields since my last college vacation; I’ll try not to slow you down.” With a full mug in hand, Daniel sat next to me while looking at Pa. “When will the order be ready for pickup?”

“As soon as they open. They texted me last night it was ready.” Pa liked to do things the old-fashioned-way, but he was no Luddite. He and Ma had satellite TV, internet service, Wi-Fi coverage in the house and the main barn, and the most recent iPhone model. “Colt’s riding into town with you instead of me.”

Daniel elbowed me and smirked. “Yeah? You gonna be my bitch today? Gonna load and unload for me?” Language at the farm was definitely different when Ma was not in the room.

“Take it easy on the city boy.” Pa was grinning like a fool. “Don’t break him on the first day. I wanna be able to use him for a couple of weeks.”

“I’m glad the two of you have so many plans for me.” I pivoted my head to look at both before settling my sight on Daniel. “Maybe I’ll steal your motorcycle and spend the next two weeks riding around Iowa instead.”

“You’ll have to learn how to ride first. You said you don’t even own a car in New York. You’ve probably forgotten how to drive one by now. And that’s easier than riding a scooter.”

“My driving’s fine, thank you. I drove all over the place when I was here for Christmas.” I stood and carried my empty plate to the sink. “Give me a few to brush my teeth and grab a hoodie. I’ll be ready to go right after.”

When I reached the barn, after yelling goodbye at my parents, Daniel was waiting in the passenger seat with the engine running. He motioned with his head for me to drive. “Let’s see if you really remember how to.”

Shaking my head, I got in. “I may not own a car, but I rent one now and then to get out of the city.”

“How come you wanted to come with me?”

“You’re picking up a part at the dealership and an order at Tractor Supply, right?”

“Yep.”

“I want to buy overalls to work in while I’m here. I’ll do it after we load up the order Pa placed. Then I’m going to stay in town and take care of something else.”

“How’re you getting back?”

I waved my hand around to indicate the truck. “I’m tired of my parents driving around in this piece of crap. I tried in December, and they turned me down. They don’t get a say this time. I’m buying them a new one.”

“Good. I’m tired of trying to keep this thing running.” Daniel had been a mechanic in the Air Force and took care of maintaining all the farm equipment. “What’s with the t-shirt?” He smirked when he glanced at me.

“Tired of people asking me when I’m gonna find a girl and get married. I figure the news will get around after anyone sees me wearing it.”

“I can understand that. My sister’s a lesbian, and she complains about the same thing.”

A couple of hours later, I crossed the street to the diner opposite the Chevy dealership. I had a little time to waste while they installed the Silverado’s bed liner and readied the truck. I sat at the counter, ordered coffee and a slice of pie, and fiddled with my phone.

“Colt? Colton Mann?”

A shiver ran down my spine. I recognized the voice. It was the last person I wanted to run into this morning. Slowly turning my head, I found Sam Hooke staring at me while holding a little girl’s hand. She was a cute tyke somewhat resembling her father.

“Hey.” I turned again and faced the serve-through window dividing the kitchen from the rest of the restaurant.

“Hey? That all you have to say?” Sam lifted the girl I assumed was his daughter and sat her on the stool next to mine. He took the one on the other side of her. “This is Poppy. You’ve never met her. Poppy, the big man’s been Daddy’s best friend since we were little ourselves.”

“Was.” I glanced at the kid and smiled at her, wishing Sam would take her and get away from me. Yesterday’s conversation with my parents had stirred old memories I thought I’d put to rest. Obviously, I’d been wrong. The pain I felt recalling them was as sharp as when Sam had discarded me.

He looked and sounded surprised. “What do you mean was?”

“Means we were friends. We haven’t been for quite a few years.” I finally stared into his eyes, trying not to let the anger I felt boil over.

“Oh, come on, Colt. Don’t be like that. When did we stop being friends?”

That did it. Was he that stupid? Did he honestly believe I would forget his hateful words? I lost it. “When you told me you couldn’t be friends with a fag!” I said it loud enough the few patrons in the place heard me. All conversation stopped, and I could tell people were staring.

Sam recoiled and swept his eyes through the diner. “Not so loud. Do you want everyone to know?”

“As a matter of fact, I do. My stare challenged him before I unzipped the hoody and turned around to look at the other patrons; suddenly everyone seemed interested on whatever was on their tables. I raised my voice a little bit more. “In case you all didn’t hear me, I’m gay. Anyone have a problem with that?” Not a peep was heard out of anyone. Sam kept a hand on Poppy’s back, stared at the counter, and mumbled something. I didn’t hear it and didn’t care.

“I said I’m sorry. I should have never reacted the way I did.”

Taking another bite from the pie, I tried to ignore him.

He would not stop. “Don’t you think we should talk about it? Your attitude could make dinner at your parents this weekend awkward.”

“There won’t be a dinner at my parents this weekend.” The news obviously surprised him. “When my mother mentioned it yesterday, I said I wouldn’t be there if she insisted on having you and your family over. And I told them why.” I was on a roll and the words flowed so fast I was having trouble keeping my composure. “Pa didn’t look happy when I recounted what you’d done and said. I’d watch my back around him if I were you.

“You have any idea how much you hurt me? The boy I grew up with? The guy who broke the state’s high school double play record with me?” Sam had played shortstop while I was the second baseman for the team. I’d gone on to play in college, but he had decided he didn’t want to go to school anymore. “The man I thought would be my friend for life? I let my guard down, and you pulled the rug from beneath my feet.

“Instead of offering support, you walked away and three months later you were married. Why was that? Were you scared when others found out about me they would suspect you of also being a fag?” Because of his daughter, I mouthed the word instead of saying it. “Did you worry people would find out about what you and I did when we discovered sex together?”

This was too much. I stood, reached in my pocket, peeled a twenty off, and slapped it on the counter. I squatted so I’d be at the same height as his girl. “It was nice meeting you, Poppy. You’re cute.” Although the poor girl probably did not grasp the meaning of the conversation, she looked bewildered by the two adults talking over her.

There was nothing else to say, and I was trembling. I ran out of the place before the tears could start.

 

 

“You’re a good boy, Colton.” Ma patted my arm and turned to head back inside the house. “You and Pa should take it out for a ride. And maybe grab some dinner while you’re out. I’m not feeling very well. I think I’ll have some tea tonight and go to bed early.”

Surprised, I glanced at Pa with a questioning look. It was early in the afternoon and Ma was talking about going to bed already? He shook his head and raised a hand to keep me quiet.

He spoke once she was out of earshot. “She’s fine. Leave her alone, and I’m sure she’ll be better tomorrow.”

“What do you think of your new truck?” He had run his hand over the chassis, smirked, and shook his head when I’d driven in and called them out to see it.

“The truck’s beautiful, but didn’t I tell you not to buy me one over Christmas?”

“Guess you’re gonna have to punish me for disobeying you. What’s up with Ma?”

Pa held his hand out and I dropped the keys on it. “She needs a little time to adjust to her new reality.”

I was confused. “What new reality?”

He pointed at my t-shirt. “Your encounter with Sam at the diner’s the talk of the town. I’m sure you weren’t out the door when the calls started. Everyone wants to know if you’re really gay.”

“Oh, for fuck’s sake. Why can’t all the busybodies mind their own business?”

“Because their lives are boring? Because they remember you as the high school and college athlete always in the news for your prowess on the field?” Pa opened the driver’s side door and slipped into the truck. “Come on. Since I’m stuck with a new truck, we may as well take it for a spin.”

 

 

“You sure you don’t want to stay? It’s been awesome working with you.” Daniel passed me the joint after taking a hit.

My time in Iowa was drawing to a close, and we were relaxing at the pond’s edge. He and I had toiled side-by-side planting seed and our incipient friendship had blossomed. “Nah, man, my life’s in New York. This has been an interesting change of pace, but I need to get home.”

The confrontations with my parents and Sam had made me realize I was a stranger in this small Iowa town. I stuck out like a sore thumb. More so after outing myself at the diner. The uproar died down after a few days, but people continued to stare at me whenever I left the farm. Fuck them all as far as I was concerned. New York allowed me to live openly as a gay man and that freedom was not likely to ever be found in the middle of nowhere.

“And anyway, aren’t you scared of what people would say if you hung out with a gay man on a regular basis?”

“Nope.” Daniel shook his head before leaning back on his elbows and staring at the opposite shore.

“That’s it? Nothing else to say?

“Nope.” He turned and smirked. “I don’t give a shit about who anyone sleeps with. None of my business. And I definitely don’t worry about what anyone else thinks.”

“Wish more people around here felt the same way. Seems like everyone’s in everyone’s business all the time. I can’t deal with it.”

 

 

The return flight I spent reflecting on the trip. I realized Sam’s rejection years before had affected me more than I ever acknowledged. Maybe the failure of every relationships since was due to me searching for someone to take his place in my life. That stopped now. No more looking for a young jock who resembled him. Traveling to Iowa had been cathartic. It was time to leave the past behind. I had the prospect of a new business to keep me occupied. Instead of spending time looking for a lover, the gym would be my companion. If and when the right man came along, I’d be ready. There would be no baggage next time.

Copyright © 2020 Carlos Hazday; All Rights Reserved.
  • Like 48
  • Love 34
  • Wow 1
  • Sad 1
  • I Read It 2

Thank you for reading and my gratitude to Kitt for her assistance with this story.

Story Discussion Topic

Welcome to the discussion thread for CJ’s series. All things CJ are fair game, I simply ask you be respectful of others. I will actively participate in the discussion. Ask questions, speculate about what’s coming, or bitch about what happened. We’re now open for business!    

Recommended Comments

Chapter Comments



5 hours ago, mfa607 said:

Great chapter!  Colt got some closure on his trip home and now it seems he can move forward.  Thank you!

SPOILER:

Colt eventually gets his shit together. LOL

  • Like 2
  • Haha 3

Share this comment


Link to comment
1 hour ago, Carlos Hazday said:

My characters have been accused of being too perfect in the past; it's refreshing to see at least some readers don't feel that way about Colt. I don't think he cares about how Sam feels these days, Colt did mention if Sam died he would not mourn. Harsh, immature, unforgiving, vindictive... call it whatever you want but it's his attitude. Since he doesn't care what other people in town think aboout him, he at last vented his anger. Personally, I would have simply moved away from Sam and not talked to him at all. The concept I was trying to get across is that in smaller communities more people tend to meddle and gossip than in larger areas. Maybe because in those town more residents know each other than in larger environments? I don't know the names of the two guys who live next to me.

I love your characters, perfect or not!  Your stories are so well written and so compelling.  You are correct about smaller towns; however, though I live in a large city (Orlando), I find each neighborhood unique.  I do know my closest neighbors and we do look out for one another.  For that, I am thankful.  Growing up, however, in a small town in West Virginia, it is true - there were neighbors who knew more about our business than we did!  At the same time, there was a genuine community where we, as children, were safe and welcome in all our neighbors' homes.

  • Like 4
  • Love 1

Share this comment


Link to comment
1 hour ago, Wesley8890 said:

Its always the same thing, "i shouldnt have said that back then" no you shouldnt have but the fact is you said it so screw off!!! 

I think you and Colt have a similar outlook. If you screw up, don't come back wanting to start again.

  • Like 3
  • Love 1

Share this comment


Link to comment
4 minutes ago, pvtguy said:

I love your characters, perfect or not!  Your stories are so well written and so compelling.  You are correct about smaller towns; however, though I live in a large city (Orlando), I find each neighborhood unique.  I do know my closest neighbors and we do look out for one another.  For that, I am thankful.  Growing up, however, in a small town in West Virginia, it is true - there were neighbors who knew more about our business than we did!  At the same time, there was a genuine community where we, as children, were safe and welcome in all our neighbors' homes.

Hell, Wilton Manors is gossip monger central. It's so inbred everyone who wants to listen can hear anything.

BTW, I've met those neighbors but we don't interact. In contrast the guys across the street and the ones in the other unit in my duplex I consider friends. In a smaller town, everyone living on the block would probably know everyone else's names.

Funny you mention West Virginia. Last week I tried to include bungee jumping off the New River Gorge Bridge in a story. Unfortunately, the days the MC had available for doing it did not include Bridge Day. I sent him to Kings Dominion in Virginia instead. :P

 

 

  • Like 4

Share this comment


Link to comment
18 minutes ago, Carlos Hazday said:

Funny you mention West Virginia. Last week I tried to include bungee jumping off the New River Gorge Bridge in a story. Unfortunately, the days the MC had available for doing it did not include Bridge Day. I sent him to Kings Dominion in Virginia instead. :P

 

 

 

I actually walked across that Bridge on the day it was dedicated and opened!

  • Like 4

Share this comment


Link to comment

Well, judging by the varied comments this chapter really got people involved (I was going to say stirred up.🤭). I believe that ear you have for dialogue really made this chapter terrific! I don't remember much about Colt,  other than a few words in passing. This closer look has quickly made him another of your interesting characters. Thanks. 

  • Like 2
  • Love 2

Share this comment


Link to comment

I grew up in the 1970’s and 80’s in a small redneck town in North Texas that was like Colt’s hometown. Friendships, relationships, and my job changed after the rumors about me came out. I was still the same person, but suddenly I was a monster in their eyes. I still battle with bitterness and pain 40 years later. 
 

Great chapter...Colt might have handled it in a better way, but sometimes you have to be brutal to get your point across.

  • Like 2
  • Love 2

Share this comment


Link to comment

Great chapter! I disagree with those who say Colt went about his interaction with Sam the wrong way. If it wasn't for his daughter being with him, I'm sure Sam would have got it much worse, which he would have totally deserved! Don't even think of coming around saying you're my best friend after saying what Sam said. He can f**k right off! 

  • Like 5

Share this comment


Link to comment
13 hours ago, JeffreyL said:

Well, judging by the varied comments this chapter really got people involved (I was going to say stirred up.🤭). I believe that ear you have for dialogue really made this chapter terrific! I don't remember much about Colt,  other than a few words in passing. This closer look has quickly made him another of your interesting characters. Thanks. 

To me, lots of discussion is a thrill. It tells me my work reached readers sufficiently to have them comment. So thank you all for the lively conversation.

Colt's been a secondary character in the CJ series for a while. Mostly (maybe exclusively) when I've written scenes set in New York.

  • Like 3

Share this comment


Link to comment
11 hours ago, Fae Briona said:

Yep - grew up in a small town and still live in one that, although it's a University town, isn't that big.

The town I grew up in is just as hostile and unaccepting of those who are differnt now as it was when I was in high school 30+ years ago.

Thank you, and others who did the same, for sharing your point of view. Most of what I know about small-town, rural America comes from conversations with friends or reading. I've ridden through many, particularly in the South, but most of the time I've enjoyed the picturesque sights without much interaction with locals.

  • Like 2

Share this comment


Link to comment
10 hours ago, Gene63 said:

I grew up in the 1970’s and 80’s in a small redneck town in North Texas that was like Colt’s hometown. Friendships, relationships, and my job changed after the rumors about me came out. I was still the same person, but suddenly I was a monster in their eyes. I still battle with bitterness and pain 40 years later. 
 

Great chapter...Colt might have handled it in a better way, but sometimes you have to be brutal to get your point across.

And yet, you survived. Good on you, Gene. Bitterness can be a motivator as long as we don't allow it to overrun our lives. Thanks for sharing.

  • Like 2
  • I Read It 1

Share this comment


Link to comment
8 hours ago, jaysalmn said:

Great chapter! I disagree with those who say Colt went about his interaction with Sam the wrong way. If it wasn't for his daughter being with him, I'm sure Sam would have got it much worse, which he would have totally deserved! Don't even think of coming around saying you're my best friend after saying what Sam said. He can f**k right off! 

Yep, I think if Poppy had not been there, Sam would have had a rougher time.

  • Like 3

Share this comment


Link to comment

Well it's my opinion that Colt was madly in love with Sam which included some early consensual sexual experimentation.  Sam's subsequent outright rejection and outing of Colt was completely devastating to him and it took several years ( and relationships) to finally let go!!  Coming home just brought the feelings back to a boiling point that was long overdo!!   Sam, being rather flippant and dismissive about it,  was certainly not the best avenue of approach!!

  • Like 3

Share this comment


Link to comment
17 hours ago, KayDeeMac said:

Well it's my opinion that Colt was madly in love with Sam which included some early consensual sexual experimentation.  Sam's subsequent outright rejection and outing of Colt was completely devastating to him and it took several years ( and relationships) to finally let go!!  Coming home just brought the feelings back to a boiling point that was long overdo!!   Sam, being rather flippant and dismissive about it,  was certainly not the best avenue of approach!!

Pretty good and pretty close to what was going through my head. I never crystallized what they had done together, but my idea was Sam was okay with fooling around until Colt came out and Sam got scared of guilt by association.

  • Like 2

Share this comment


Link to comment

COLTON MANN! I don't care how big a boy you think you are, you DO NOT talk at your mama like that! She may be having a difficult time accepting you're gay but she bore and birthed you and cleaned up after you and has not rejected you. Consider if you might the dreams she had for you growing up, the grandchildren she imagined and how those dreams changed. She is a product of small town America. She likely grew up having every fault or transgression discussed on the public grapevine and loathes how it made her feel as much as you loathe how Sam's rejection made you feel. She lives here among these people and likely doesn't relish herself and her child the subject of derision and gossip. This is where her life is she isn't leaving to go back to New York. It's not so easy for her to say "fuck 'em" and what they think. She invited Sam and his family to dinner because he had been your best friend and she didn't know what fell out between the two of you. She thought you would be glad to see him just as she would be to see one of her childhood friends after such a long time being so far away. I hope that once you'd both settled your emotions you at least had the courtesy and respect for her to apologize for your langauge. I'm not saying you should ever apologize for being who you are and you definitely need to make that clear to her but you don't talk to your mama that way. Am I clear?

I hope this visit to his parents was as cathartic for Colt as its seems. He definitely needed to exorcise some demons.

As a side thought, I know his life isn't in Iowa but I wonder how people's attitudes might have changed once they realized that Colt as a man isn't so very different from the boy/teen they knew and admired. So he's gay, he's still Colt Mann. Maybe just maybe realizing he's as "normal" as they are would make some of them stop seeing gays as the frightening "other".

Great chapter by the way.

  • Like 2

Share this comment


Link to comment
On 9/15/2020 at 1:04 PM, Carlos Hazday said:

I'm an equal opportunity detractor for all SEC teams.

But you best treat the BIG10 with all the courtesy and respect we deserve.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this comment


Link to comment
dughlas

Posted (edited)

On 9/15/2020 at 1:30 PM, Carlos Hazday said:

I don't know the names of the two guys who live next to me.

And that's a sad commentary on our society. I grew up in on a one block long side street in a small town. Everybody knew everybody some not as well as others but immediate neighbors certainly. The older couple in the other half of our duplex had teenage sons the youngest acted as my surrogate big brother/uncle. His parents became like an extra set of grandparents. Now I know the folks in the folks in the house to the immediate east of me. The folks to the west I know to say hello and wave to. Beyond that I don't know folks and I've lived here 35+ years. Though I must admit that the guy two doors to the east is a drool worthy slighty built dark ginger with chest hair that glistens when he sweats. What ?!? He works in his vegetable garden shirtless and I've got functional eyes. Oh, and I do know his name, it's Brandon.

Edited by dughlas
  • Like 2

Share this comment


Link to comment

@dughlas I dislike Ohio State but am able to stomach most of the other teams. I kinda like Michigan. :P

Mrs. Mann, while trying to do what she felt was right, forgot to ask Colt about it in advance. The yelling and disagreeing may have been avoided had she done so. Of course, she sounds a bit too clueless if after all these years she's unaware her son does not like Sam.

As for the argument because I gave birth to you being used as sufficient to justify almost anything, My brother and I had a similar response whenever our mother brought it out: Nobody asked you to fuck with Dad and get pregnant. We would have not minded never being born. We wouldn't have known. Throwing in the 'fucking Dad' line always got a strong reaction. Mom was prude who raised sex perverts.

As a kid, my block had six houses with a beach club across the street. My godparents lived next to us and my mother's uncle at the end of the block. Even after all those households except one were relocated to the United States, the friendships continued. Times have changed.

  • Like 2

Share this comment


Link to comment
3 hours ago, Carlos Hazday said:

@dughlas I dislike Ohio State but am able to stomach most of the other teams. I kinda like Michigan. :P

Mrs. Mann, while trying to do what she felt was right, forgot to ask Colt about it in advance. The yelling and disagreeing may have been avoided had she done so. Of course, she sounds a bit too clueless if after all these years she's unaware her son does not like Sam.

As for the argument because I gave birth to you being used as sufficient to justify almost anything, My brother and I had a similar response whenever our mother brought it out: Nobody asked you to fuck with Dad and get pregnant. We would have not minded never being born. We wouldn't have known. Throwing in the 'fucking Dad' line always got a strong reaction. Mom was prude who raised sex perverts.

As a kid, my block had six houses with a beach club across the street. My godparents lived next to us and my mother's uncle at the end of the block. Even after all those households except one were relocated to the United States, the friendships continued. Times have changed.

I don't like Ohio State either and truth be told I only actively cheer on the others when they're playing against Ohio or in a bowl game.

I suspect from his response that Papa Mann was also unaware of Cole's feelings about Sam. I suspect that sometimes parents see distance forming between their kids and their friends as part of growing up and going separate ways. I think Cole did an exceptional job of hiding what happened between himself and Sam. Of course they're your characters so you should know them best.

"I gave birth to you" isn't grounds for winning an argument, neither is "Because I'm your mother" but it is grounds for respect. He could have expressed himself without the cussing and still made his point. Part of my feeling on that may stem from the fact I wouldn't speak to my mother that way.

  • Like 2

Share this comment


Link to comment

Well, damn.. Glad he cleared the air with his parents and got the whole thing with Sam off his chest.  I read the other comments and I agree it might have been an immature way to handle the situation, but sometimes that’s just what you do. Plus he was already on the offensive heading into town so there was no way this wasn’t happening the way it did. Lol. 
 

  • Like 2

Share this comment


Link to comment
12 hours ago, dughlas said:

I don't like Ohio State either and truth be told I only actively cheer on the others when they're playing against Ohio or in a bowl game.

I suspect from his response that Papa Mann was also unaware of Cole's feelings about Sam. I suspect that sometimes parents see distance forming between their kids and their friends as part of growing up and going separate ways. I think Cole did an exceptional job of hiding what happened between himself and Sam. Of course they're your characters so you should know them best.

"I gave birth to you" isn't grounds for winning an argument, neither is "Because I'm your mother" but it is grounds for respect. He could have expressed himself without the cussing and still made his point. Part of my feeling on that may stem from the fact I wouldn't speak to my mother that way.

I remember when Penn State and Miami were both independent and played each other all the time.

Colt, I think, wasn't even aware of how much he'd been holding in. Avoidance is a way of dealing with issues that doesn't always work. Even after years of not interacting, a mention from Mrs. Mann, and one glance at his former friend in the diner both made Colt lose it.

Share this comment


Link to comment

View Guidelines

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Our Privacy Policy can be found here. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..