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MartyS

Confessions, Observations and Wishful Dreaming

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Confessions, Observations and Wishful Dreaming

 

I hate to admit it, but I goofed. I do not know how many times I have read and reread the Prologue. Once I reached the conclusion that, Dirk and Rachel had switched the Ares and Atlantis, I totally failed to properly read and consider a rather important paragraph.

 

I admit to being a speed-reader. Many times I miss something that is buried in the text. Doing so around CJ can have disastrous consequences.

 

It was my belief; the time-span for the charter was five days. This assessment was arrived at, based on the information contained in the following two excerpts.

 

“As the shuttle faded from sight, Rachel hauled up the mainsail and began trimming the Ares for her hundred-and-fifty mile overnight voyage to the reefs and cays of Grand Bahama Bank, where they would spend four days”

 

“After the charter, Ares dropped the guests off at Nassau on schedule and Rachel filed a route plan to take her directly home. Rachel sailed from Nassau as the last rays of sunset glittered off the calm, azure seas.”

 

I failed to note the following passage from an earlier paragraph:

 

“on a private scuba charter that included a close look at a shuttle launch and then ten days on the reefs in the Bahamas.”

 

All the above quotes I attribute to the Narrator of this Saga. It is my understanding, an author, writing as the Narrator, may not lie. He is allowed to misdirect the reader, but must tell the truth. In all honesty, CJ did a first-rate job on me.

 

My erroneous understanding was the length of the charter. I incorrectly concluded, it was for five days. Once I factored in the information, from the earlier paragraph, it was twice that duration. I am not sure how this affects the story. However, let this be mea maxima culpa

 

I discovered my error when I returned to the Prologue to review my understanding of Rachel. Part of my conclusions, regarding her character, was and is, she enjoyed being “at sea.” The following quote by Shane raises some doubt, in my mind, that Rachel is using the nom de plume, Sarah Blake.

 

QUOTE SHANE. “I didn’t know them at all at first, but pretty quick I was living with them on Kookaburra and doing charters, though Mrs. Blake only came along a few times.”

 

When you examine the entire dialogue, by Shane, It appears he is speaking from his heart.

 

I am solidly on record as stating, “I do no know where Rachel is, nor what she is doing, at the present time. (November 2006)

 

This is not so with Shane’s attempt to miss-direct Trevor regarding Martin Blake’s spread. (Ranch, farm?) In a previous chapter, Martin, in a private conversation with Shane mentions having to return home directly because; “he had some ewes getting ready to lamb.”

 

One thought popped into my head when I read Martin’s comment the first time. I know as much about ranching and farming as I do about deep sea diving. My limited knowledge has been gained by reading. One thing I have become aware of. When you are involved in either of these occupations, the day’s work starts at sunup and ends when you are finished. Both of these livelihoods are a 24 x 7 x 52+, sort of job. Until Chapter 70, the Blake’s were described as living elsewhere during the non-boating season. Never a comment regarding the type of lifestyle or activities they were involved in. The thought that came immediately to my mind, after reading his statement was: Who takes care of these matters, when he is “Sailing, Sailing, over the bounding main?”

 

This raised a futher question, in my mind, “Why had Martin gotten involved in boating, even more so, the commercial operation of a charter vessel.” The definition “A boat is a hole in the water, surrounded by wood, metal or fiberglass, into which you pour money,” is an axiom. Martin had previously stated, the income from Trevor’s charter, was very welcome.

 

A fifty-five foot boat is a rather big challenge for a novice. Compare Trevor’s descriptions of two different homeports. His vivid description of the waters and piloting in Florida and Shark’s Bay is enlightening. Shane had crewed aboard Kookaburra long enough to be permitted to live aboard, during the off-season. He was honest about his inability to handle her in confined waters. So, Who taught Martin? You don’t learn how to conn a vessel out of a book. A Lagoon 55 or 57 appears to me to be a vessel with little draft compared to their freeboard. Add in their superstructure and upperworks. Even with all her sails furled, in my opinion either vessel could be easily affected by a light breeze in close waters. Shane is the Tour Director. Trevor has the Conn. I repeat, you don’t learn how to conn a vessel out of a book. Again I ask: Who taught Martin? His explanation to Trevor, regarding his learning, I would best describe as brief and sketchy. Martin Blake does not appear to be a reticent man.

 

If Shane wants to setup Trevor, he should do a little research. Since Trevor admits to never having seen a kangaroo, Shane can tell him almost anything. But, payback can be a bitch.

 

As to “Trevor’s Clunker,” and the Dark Duo’s plans for it. Their plans bring to mind, the following lines of verse, which express my wishes for their strategy.

 

(Penned by Robert Burns, regarded as Scotland’s national poet.)

 

The best-laid schemes o' mice an' men

Gang aft agley,

An' lea'e us nought but grief an' pain,

For promis'd joy

 

Translation for any Sassenachs:

 

The best laid schemes of mice and men

Go often askew,

And leave us nothing but grief and pain,

For promised joy!

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I won't comment on any specifics of what you've said above but you're going to be laughing at some of the things you've said.

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I won't comment on any specifics of what you've said above but you're going to be laughing at some of the things you've said.

 

Thank you TalonRider, for your illuminating remarks. I always enjoy a good laugh. This is the most fun I have had in years. With or without my trousers on.

 

Marty

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TalonRider

 

Is it your prediction, that I will be ROFLMAO, when I become of the aware of the subject matter you prophesy? If this is the case, I will speculate, my trousers might well come off. This should most likely increase the jocularity of the occasion, for any observers.

 

Marty

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A lagoon 55 and 57 had a draft of 3 feet, 11 inches, with the daggerboards up. Their hulls would as you suggest have significant sail area, enough to make maneuvering in close quarters interesting (not in a good way) in windy conditions. Cats are harder to maneuver than monohulls as a rule. :)

 

Characters can be mistaken, or lie, or tell halftruths. The narrator must be truthful, though he does not have to tell everything. As a practical matter, it's a sad fact that the narrator might make a factual mistake, but that must be corrected, because it is an error and thus not a part of the story. For example, if the narrator (meaning the author) puts his foot in it and makes a factual goof, it has to be fixed (and the author thus owes a debt of gratitude to the person pointing out the error). There will be a perfect example (two, actually) of this in a forum post by me (probably Friday, internet connection permitting). :)

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