Jump to content

Open Club  ·  182 members  ·  Free

Mark Arbour Fan Club

Random Research Questions for CAP


Recommended Posts

So I posed this question to Mark, and he wasn't really sure, so I thought I'd pose this to you guys...since JJ is getting homeschooled by a tutor, how exactly does JJ get evaluated to see what  grade level he's completed? How is he considered "graduated"? How is  this different from what happens with a GED? Because I kind of figured that homeschool kids took some kind of standardized test  similar to a GED (if not the GED) as their means of passing a grade or something.

 

Mark's been telling me that GED's would have a stigma with the family, but I can't really see it being THAT much of an issue with the family, as long as JJ's proving he had the equivalent of a high school education. There are quite a few actors and actresses that did the GED path and it doesn't seem like something that would be unheard of for their socioeconomic circles, especially when it comes to the Hollywood kids that they probably hung out with.

 

We do know that JJ has a tutor, but it doesn't seem like he's been enrolled in school since the 9th grade, so he'd have to be entirely homeschooled for most of his high school experience. It doesn't seem like JJ's enrolled in school and then using his tutor for the months that he has to take off.

Link to comment

I agree with Mark on that one. A GED would be completely unacceptable by this family's standards. Here's the thing, a GED is *not* a diploma. It is not used as an equivalent by many employers, up to and including the US Military.

 

California has an alternative exam called the California High School Proficiency Exam that is, by statute Education Code Section 48412, an acceptable substitute. Home schooled Californians would be directed to that exam, and I know it was available in 2001 as a couple of my friends took it rather than finish our senior year. I do not know if Massachusetts has an equivalent to that, or if they find GEDs good enough.

 

Honestly, if JJ even suggested a GED, I can definitely see Brad, JP, et al, deciding right then and there to end his skating career, because it would at that point be threatening the entire rest of his life.

  • Like 1
Link to comment

I agree with Mark on that one. A GED would be completely unacceptable by this family's standards. Here's the thing, a GED is *not* a diploma. It is not used as an equivalent by many employers, up to and including the US Military.

 

California has an alternative exam called the California High School Proficiency Exam that is, by statute Education Code Section 48412, an acceptable substitute. Home schooled Californians would be directed to that exam, and I know it was available in 2001 as a couple of my friends took it rather than finish our senior year. I do not know if Massachusetts has an equivalent to that, or if they find GEDs good enough.

 

Honestly, if JJ even suggested a GED, I can definitely see Brad, JP, et al, deciding right then and there to end his skating career, because it would at that point be threatening the entire rest of his life.

 

Yes.

Link to comment

I suspect PSAT and SAT along with reports from the tutors would work. Also most states require proficiency tests under No Child Left Behind and he would be able to take them at a local school.  Or/and a letter from Grand has done wonders for others. I suspect JJ's education has been more rigorous than most home schooled children. 

Link to comment

I agree with Mark on that one. A GED would be completely unacceptable by this family's standards. Here's the thing, a GED is *not* a diploma. It is not used as an equivalent by many employers, up to and including the US Military.

 

California has an alternative exam called the California High School Proficiency Exam that is, by statute Education Code Section 48412, an acceptable substitute. Home schooled Californians would be directed to that exam, and I know it was available in 2001 as a couple of my friends took it rather than finish our senior year. I do not know if Massachusetts has an equivalent to that, or if they find GEDs good enough.

 

Honestly, if JJ even suggested a GED, I can definitely see Brad, JP, et al, deciding right then and there to end his skating career, because it would at that point be threatening the entire rest of his life.

 

*deflates* Fine. No GED then. We'll just pretend that JJ eventually plans on taking that California. (I checked Massachusetts and they're apparently a GED state.)

 

 I'm just really curious. It's not really something I can see Mark covering because JJ's a pretty peripheral character as it is, but I'm curious to see if JJ's attitude has evolved from where it was when he was in 9th grade(and under the thrall of his coach) and didn't think he needed school because he'd be on the cover of a Wheaties box by the age of 20. Like maybe JJ is actually interested in things like writing and history or something. Or if JJ is still pretty apathetic about school and education because he's pinning everything on that Olympic Gold Medal. (Which we know he'll never get.)

Edited by methodwriter85
  • Like 1
Link to comment

I couldn't find the story that prompted this question, so like any uniformed person, I'll weigh in anyway...(forgive me).

 

There are any number of 'elite' institutions with which a tutor might have an affiliation that for the correct insentive will provide whatever credentials are needed for higher education, jobs, etc.  Tuition, not attendance, is required.  All such institutions will deny these services, but if you've had the opportunity to attend school or work with one of these graduates, you will have no doubt.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
  • 2 weeks later...

I am not sure how accurate my information is because it is second and sometimes third hand. Several young ladies I know are competing on the regional horse show circuits and as such are being tutored similarly to what I assume JJ is receiving. Parents have told me they are required to pass all the usual competency tests for their grade levels including the same final exam as anyone else in their grade level to advance and I am told they will get the same diploma as those who are physically attending school. I do no know if they are allowed to walk with the rest of the class.

  • Like 1
Link to comment

Since I was curious, the tutorial relationship suggested would probably fly. He'd get the same education (arguably superior), and still qualify for a diploma. But not a GED. I'm not sure how it is in other states, but in California "GED" is too closely associated with "high school drop out" to be acceptable, even allowing for his special circumstances and needs.

 

I think his ability to walk would depend on the institution itself. One woman in the year ahead of me took a year long course of study at USC instead of doing her senior year at our high school, but she was allowed to walk. In fact, she was technically valedictorian, although they selected another person who actually took the same classes as the rest of the senior class. But small town, fewer actual rules.

  • Like 1
Link to comment

I honestly can't see JJ giving a shit about graduating with a bunch of people he didn't even really go to school with. He really doesn't seem all that concerned with hitting the typical teenage rites of passages. Probably because he doesn't want to be a typical teenager in any way, shape, or form.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
  • 1 year later...

I agree with Mark on that one. A GED would be completely unacceptable by this family's standards. Here's the thing, a GED is *not* a diploma. It is not used as an equivalent by many employers, up to and including the US Military.

 

California has an alternative exam called the California High School Proficiency Exam that is, by statute Education Code Section 48412, an acceptable substitute. Home schooled Californians would be directed to that exam, and I know it was available in 2001 as a couple of my friends took it rather than finish our senior year. I do not know if Massachusetts has an equivalent to that, or if they find GEDs good enough.

 

Honestly, if JJ even suggested a GED, I can definitely see Brad, JP, et al, deciding right then and there to end his skating career, because it would at that point be threatening the entire rest of his life.

 

Well, this was all for moot.

 

JJ's skating sabbatical timed conveniently for him to finish his last year of high school with no interruptions.

Link to comment
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Our Privacy Policy can be found here: Privacy Policy. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..