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Weird Expressions


Yettie One

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The words and expressions that we use as slang have always interested me. There is such a range of terminology, and every generation has its own strange expressions that make others frown.

 

So what cool/strange/weird words/expressions do/have you used?

 

Here is a few from me to kick off.

 

An expression of nice/cool = Dope. Kiff. Wicked. Lacker. Mooshy.

 

A guy mate = Oak. Ox. Geezer. Buttie boy. Cocker. Boyo.

 

Friendly fool = You Chop. You Tit. You Nob.

 

Money = Notes. Doe. Bucks. Quid. Dosh.

 

Home = Crib. Doss House.

 

Greeting = Yo. Sup. Howzit. Ella.

 

To Sleep = I was Dossing. I was catching some Zeee's. Get some shut eye.

 

Some expressions :P

 

Voetsak (said - foot sack) Actually Afrikaans meaning go away in the same way you'd cuss.

 

Baie Dankie (said almost like - Buy a donkey) again Afrikaans for thank you very much.

 

Just a few to kick it off. :P

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Sheila - Woman

 

Bloody Hell - It's like What the hell.

 

Abso-f**cking-lutely - Extremely in agreement.

 

Git - Idiot

 

Flooded - Cramped with Work

 

Nickers/Undies - Briefs/Panties

 

Good Arvo - Good Afternoon

 

Avos - Avocado

 

Bastard - Something I say to my dear dear friends

 

Barbie - Barbecue

 

Beaut - Fantastic or Pretty

 

Bloody Oath - True

 

Moolah - Money

 

Pash - Kiss

 

Reckon - It's like absolutely

 

Rubbish - Nonsense

 

Stubby - Those small beers

 

Stoked - I'm excited

 

Fair Dinkum - Awesome bloke

 

Fair Go - Give it a try

 

There's still lots of it. But I generally don't speak bogan unless provoked. Haha.

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So many.

 

Slang terms for money (some are Cockney rhyming slang):

 

Shrapnel = 1p and 2p coins (comes from shrapnel being small bits of metal)

 

Godiva = £5 (Lady Godiva = fiver; fiver is a slang term for £5)

 

Cockle = £10 (comes from: cock and hen = ten)

 

Apple = £20 (apple core = score; score is an old fashioned term for twenty)

 

Pony = £25 (back in the days of the Empire, the Indian 25 rupee bank note had a picture of a pony on it)

 

Ton = £100 (comes from 100 cubic feet of storage capacity in shipping was called a ton)

 

Monkey = £500 (back in the days of the Empire, the Indian 500 rupee bank note had a picture of a monkey on it)

 

G or K = £1000 (G is simply the abbreviation of "grand", in that one grand = £1000; K is the abbreviation of the prefix kilo, there are 1000 units in a kilo)

Edited by andy021278
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Minging - unattractive/unpleasant

 

Lush - very attractive/very nice (Fuck he's lush inne? Aww luv, that meal was lush)

 

Mint - very attractive (She's mint (minty, minted) she is)

 

But - mate (applied to just about anyone, usually male as in a'rite but? being a casual greeting)

 

Me ducks - my friend (Ow ye doing me ducks?)

 

Chicken/Chick - term of endearment (C'mere and give us a kiss, chick)

 

fucktard - a really stupid person

 

Hammered - pissed as a rat - very drunk

 

Off his face - very drunk

 

Rat arsed - ratted - very drunk

 

Pissed - very drunk

 

Gob off - speak cheekily./ rant (Oi don't you gob off on me you fucktard)

 

Gob - mouth (she's got a gob on 'er, she 'ave. She'd better shut er gob or she'll be avin a mouthful off me)

 

Mouthful - telling off

 

Turned around and said - said (Ai, she turned around and said she wasn't with 'im but I saw 'er neckin round back)

 

Necking - heavy petting

 

Shum ai (spelled Sut wyt ti (don't ask) ) How are you? Are you alright? Yeah like fuck you are)

 

Cariad (term of affection (literally loved one) Aw cariad, come ere for a cwtch then)

 

Cwtch - cuddle, cupboard under the stairs

 

Bach - little, or term of endearment especially for a youngster

 

Dedoreth - simple minded (She was right dedoreth she was, di'nt know what she was going on about)

 

 

 

LOADS MORE :)

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Lets try a bit of Yorkshiire :P

 

Well! I'll gutta foot t'of our stairs...... An exclaimation of surprise.

 

Neither nowt na summat...... Something and nothing.

 

Nah bloody claithes on........ Usually said to me lol about having no clothes on.

 

Fair t'middlin......I'm feeling fine.

 

Tha' knows.......You know.

 

Eeeee by 'eckers like...... You don't say? Disbelief.

 

Silin' it down...... Raining hard.

 

Yon....... Over there.

 

Ay up...... Hello

 

Afore....Before

 

Wellies....Wellington boots and a slang term for condoms LOL.

 

So, so many more.

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Lets try a bit of Yorkshiire Posted Image

 

Well! I'll gutta foot t'of our stairs...... An exclaimation of surprise.

 

Neither nowt na summat...... Something and nothing.

 

Nah bloody claithes on........ Usually said to me lol about having no clothes on.

 

Fair t'middlin......I'm feeling fine.

 

Tha' knows.......You know.

 

Eeeee by 'eckers like...... You don't say? Disbelief.

 

Silin' it down...... Raining hard.

 

Yon....... Over there.

 

Ay up...... Hello

 

Afore....Before

 

Wellies....Wellington boots and a slang term for condoms LOL.

 

So, so many more.

 

I could actually use this in my writing. *giggles*

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Fair t'middlin......I'm feeling fine.

 

Growing up in Memphis TN, I've heard "fair to middlin" all my life with exactly the same meaning. I suppose it came from Yorkshire. The only other use of "middling" that I've heard is a reference to a medium grade of some commodity, a grain or cotton for example.

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Growing up in Memphis TN, I've heard "fair to middlin" all my life with exactly the same meaning. I suppose it came from Yorkshire. The only other use of "middling" that I've heard is a reference to a medium grade of some commodity, a grain or cotton for example.

 

I think by Yorkshire standing, 'middling' means in the middle. As in fair is okay. middling is neither good nor bad. :)

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I think this applies here.

 

Bunnyhug. This is known to the rest of the world as a hoodie or hooded sweatshirt. The term originates and is mostly just used in and around Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. I grew up calling hoodies bunnyhugs. I never had a clue about any other name for them, lol.

Edited by Breeze
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Bunnyhug. This is known to the rest of the world as a hoodie or hooded sweatshirt.

 

Posted Image

You are right in that in our neck of the woods we certainly do call them hoodies, but the term has evolved to refer to a specific section of youth here in the UK otherwise known as Chavs. Guys and girls that hang around on street corners, dressed mainly in track suit bottoms, or trackies as they call them, and a hoodie.

 

Thing is, in our world of anti social behaviour, perpetrated by bored youth, who are just out looking for some risky thing to entertain themselves, the term 'Hoodie' has become synonymous with the person, rather than the item of clothing, to the extent where even politicians have tried to get in on the act, our current Prime Minister having once suggested that instead of deamonising our anti social youth, if we call 'Hugged a Hoodie' we'd impact in a positive way on our out of control youth.

 

When I read that you guys call them a bunnyhug, I cracked up. Maybe we really need to be considering renaming the offending item of clothing rather than physically using the emotional embrace. :D

 

Some amazing expressions and slang terms coming out. That Cockney Rhyming Slang has always amazed me. I often wonder how the heck it started. Posted Image

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That Cockney Rhyming Slang has always amazed me. I often wonder how the heck it started. Posted Image

 

All I know is that it started in the mid 19th century (probably the 1840s) and was used by street salesmen (think Steptoe and Son).

 

Though there are some very amusing things that come about because of the way Cockney Rhyming Slang is often truncated (apple and pears = stairs, but we usually just say "apples"; dog and bone = phone, but we usually just say "dog"), so some word origins are obscure to anyone who doesn't know the slang.

 

One of the more extreme examples: Most of us know the word "berk" which is a very mild pejorative for an idiot or a foolish person, however it actually comes from the Cockney "Berkeley Hunt" (Berkeley was truncated to "Berk" and still is), which is the Cockney Rhyming Slang for one of the GA banned words (since there are only two, it shouldn't be too hard to guess which word I mean).

 

So the next time you quite innocently call someone a berk, keep in mind what you are actually calling them Posted Image .

Edited by andy021278
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I think this applies here.

 

Bunnyhug. This is known to the rest of the world as a hoodie or hooded sweatshirt. The term originates and is mostly just used in and around Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. I grew up calling hoodies bunnyhugs. I never had a clue about any other name for them, lol.

 

The only "bunnyhug" I've heard of is the dance :)

 

 

 

 

You are right in that in our neck of the woods we certainly do call them hoodies, but the term has evolved to refer to a specific section of youth here in the UK otherwise known as Chavs. Guys and girls that hang around on street corners, dressed mainly in track suit bottoms, or trackies as they call them, and a hoodie.

 

If I started calling some of our local hoodies "bunnyhugs", I'd end up in my local hospital sucking dinner through a straw :lol:

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here when I saw this... i thought Weird expressions...

as in making faces... I was going to say I can wiggle my ears with just my eyebrows... does that count?

 

I kinda consider

Yesh to be a bit wierd.. I use it sometimes...but it's still wierd to me.

so is Yant

and a few others i can't think of att the moment...

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In the sixty years I knew the man, I never heard my father say "thank you" to anyone. He wasn't an ingrate or boor. He had a more heartfelt way of expressing thanks. He always said "much obliged". It really implies a sense of obligation for a kindness done by another.

 

Perhaps Dad overused the expression, but I was always impressed. Several years ago, I asked a British friend if he ever heard the term there. He had heard it, but it was rare these days.

 

Have you ever heard "much obliged"? Does it seem quaint or excessive to you?

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Here's a few from Mississippi:

 

The lights are on but nobodies home = not very bright

 

this ain't my first rodeo = I've been around

 

as full of wind as a corn eating horse = boastful

 

ju-heer = did you hear?

 

jeet? = did you eat?

 

wan to? = Want to?

 

Lagniappe = something extra (like buy your wife a diamond ring and get a free shotgun).

 

cut your own weeds = mind your own business

 

Marred = married

 

 

Cajun:

 

Make the misere = to cause trouble

 

Up the bayou = North

 

Down the bayou = South

 

gree-gree = to curse someone

 

boy = a male from 6 to 60

 

T'Paul = little Paul, works with other names too

 

Most of the rest is a derivative of French and won't mean much.

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Growing up in Memphis TN, I've heard "fair to middlin" all my life with exactly the same meaning. I suppose it came from Yorkshire. The only other use of "middling" that I've heard is a reference to a medium grade of some commodity, a grain or cotton for example.

 

"Fair to middling" is a high grade of cotton. Heard it all my life in TX. Great granddad grew cotton.

 

In high cotton - doing well.

 

Good Lord willin' and the creek don't rise - I'll be there if I can.

 

Bless his/her heart - what an idiot.

 

Wrong side of payday - low on cash.

 

Fixin' to - getting ready to.

 

Travelling by shanks' mare - walking.

 

Lower than a snake's belly in a wagon rut - unsavory.

 

Dressed for high water - your pants are too short.

 

Belly button gnawing at your back bone - hungry.

 

Even a blind hog finds an acorn once in a while - got lucky.

 

Lick that calf - to perform an undesirable task out of love or duty. When a mama cow has a calf, she starts licking it clean, all that stuff gets all cold and nasty, but she just loves her little baby, so she keeps licking it until it's totally clean and dry.

Edited by rustle
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Rustle, tell us about "hot as the hinges".

 

Hot as the hinges refers to the gates of hell. Hot enough to fry a frog on the sidewalk.*

 

Horny as a 3-headed billy goat.

 

South end of a northbound horse.

 

He'd bitch if they hung him with a new rope.

 

* No offense, MikeL.

Edited by rustle
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So many!

 

Not got the brains of a caravan site = won't be winning Mastermind anytime soon Posted Image

 

Mad as a box of frogs = self explanatory Posted Image

 

Face like a bag of spanners = won't be winning any beauty contest

 

Like a rat up a drainpipe = it moved fast

 

Gone to the dogs = got into a bad state [from dog race betting?]

 

Face the music = accept bad things coming your way

 

Pig in a poke = a bad deal

 

Yank his chain = provoke

 

You can whistle for it = you won't get it

 

Wrong end of the stick = misunderstanding [from Roman toilet wipes?]

 

Chew the fat = gossip

 

Mutton dressed as lamb = oldies trying to look young

 

Go bile yer heed [go boil your head] = go away [heheh maybe something a bit stronger than this]

 

Never had an accident, but seen plenty in her rear view mirror = the kind of driver you'd rather take public transport than ride with Posted Image

 

A real toilet blocker = visitors unlikely to be invited back Posted Image

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