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LJH

Where is it from: Classics Only

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Rules:

  • No googling
  • No wiki
  • Author and book must be answered before moving on.  
  • The person who answers the question/s correctly must pose the next question.
  • The poster can ask an additional question for 1 point only.
  • Only three clues allowed. If no winner after third clue, the poster must give answer and proceed to next question.
  • 6 points per correct answer.
  • 1st clue answer = 5 points. 2nd Clue answer = 3 points. 3rd Clue answer = 1 point.
  • If no answer after 1 week = 5 days then post answer and another question.
  • Posters of questions earn 3 points per question.
  • If the question is unanswered, the poster of that question scores an extra 3 points.
  • Please keep a tally of your own points. All points are to be reflected in each post. See my example below.
  • Definition of classics: a book considered as being exemplary or noteworthy for its literary value as listed by foreign and Western canons or thru a reader's own opinion.
  • You may quote foreign classics translated into English. i.e., The Unbearable Lightness of Being etc.  There are hundreds.
  • You may quote any novel awarded  with a prize, Nobel Prize etc. There are numerous other prizes that you can mention as a further question or in a clue.
  • You may quote modern classics. i.e, Hemingway, Faulkner, Knowles, Hollinghurst, Edmund White, Kramer and so forth, there are hundreds.  
  • You may quote Children's Classics. 
  • All genres are allowed.

 

I will start off hehehe:

"No amount of fire or freshness can challenge what a man will store up in his ghostly heart."
Author and book please.
Additional question for 1 point: In which year did the author die?

Points: LJH 3

Edited by LJH
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Dude. what the hell? I guess you just wanted to start with an easy one, I suppose.

 

F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby and I recall memorizing the writer deaths of that time period by famous war-related dates, and Fitzgerald died almost exactly a year before Pearl Harbor, so that would make it 1940, I suppose. Like Daisy, I suppose the reality of the ease of this competition doesn't match the fantasy of the ideal. :P

 

BTW, how do you define a classic? I mean I guess some are obvious, but others are not so obvious so what is this game's definition of a classic? Can we go with foreign authors translated into English?

 

I assume the winner of the last problem starts a new one?

 

If that's the case, I guess I'll also go easy on people until I know the rules of what can be considered a classic:

 

"Nothing endures. Not a tree. Not love. Not even death by violence."

Edited by thebrinkoftime
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Correct.

Yes, you may quote foreign classics translated into English.

Defining classics: a book considered as being exemplary or noteworthy for its literary value as listed by foreign and Western canons or thru a reader's own opinion . As long as it is considered a classic from any time frame: from Homer to Hemingway to etc.

 

Also please ensure you put your points in the post.

 

Yes the winner poses the next question.

 

Brink: Points Collected 7

 

Way to go coolness.

Edited by LJH

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Does modern classics count?  I am curious about that.

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Yes.  Modern Classics are included.  I consider One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest to be a Modern Classic. 

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Brink the quote is from:

A separate peace by John Knowles

 

my turn-

 

'If he loved with all the powers of his puny being, he couldn't love as much in eighty years as I could in a day'

 

book and author please

 

scotty 94-9 points

Edited by scotty94

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Good job, scotty94!

 

You should have quote that butler with the crazy, hard-to-understand accent, though maybe that would have been too easy because people tend to remember.

 

In any case, Wuthering Heights, by Emily Bronte. You can go hit your head on a tree now, Heathcliff.

 

My turn! It's time to get tricky here:

 

"'I dream with open eyes,' he answered, looking around at the door, 'and others see my dreams. That is all.'"

 

If you can get it on the first go, then I proclaim you a man or woman of incredibly good literary taste. For an extra point, name a famous writer who praised the book.

 

I think I've got 13 points. I'm not sure whether I get 3 points each for posing the next question, as it's part of the rules. Do you only get 3 points for posing the question when you start up the game again in the case nobody can answer one of the problems?

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3 points per question.
Scotty = 6+3 =9
Brink = 7+3+6+3=19
LJH=3

Edited by LJH

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I'm not completely sure brink on that one that one but i think it is-

 

A voyage to Arcturus by David Lindsay 

 

am I correct please tell me so i can tally my score and add the when i edit the post.

 

my next one if I'm correct with that one is-

 

“Suffering has been stronger than all other teaching, and has taught me to understand what your heart used to be. I have been bent and broken, but - I hope - into a better shape.”

 

if you don't get this one you are a not a book  worm.

 

book and author please.

Edited by scotty94

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I know the answer to this Scotty, but I'll wait for Brink to confirm your answer first.  I love the old classics. 

 

LJH 3

Edited by LJH

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Wow, I did not expect someone to get that so quickly! I'm impressed. You have been confirmed to have good taste! That seance scene at the beginning always blows me away. It's one hell of a setup.

 

Well, since LJH claimed the answer to your query, my expectations are great that he knows the answer, so I guess I'll sit this one out.

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YAY!! correct 18 point for me.

 

scotty94=18 points


Wow, I did not expect someone to get that so quickly! I'm impressed. You have been confirmed to have good taste! That seance scene at the beginning always blows me away. It's one hell of a setup.

 

Well, since LJH claimed the answer to your query, my expectations are great that he knows the answer, so I guess I'll sit this one out.

brink were you trying to say something with that last message.

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Great Expectations

Dickens

 

Who can forget Philip Pirip or Pip? The way in which he rejected the poverty of his childhood and looked down on those less fortunate. Hmmmm....

 

Question to follow.

 

LJH 9

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The wind grew stronger, whisked under stones, carried up straws and old leaves, and even little clods, marking its course as it sailed across the fields. The air and the sky darkened, and through them the sun shone redly, and there was a raw sting in the air.  During the night the wind raced faster over the land, dug cunningly among the rootlets of the corn and the corn fought the wind with its weakened leaves until the roots were freed by the prying wind and then each stalk settled wearily sideways toward the earth and pointed in the direction of the wind.

 

Extra question: In which year was the author awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature?

 

LJH 12

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I wonder if we should lose points for incorrect answers....hmmmm, something to think about.

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the grapes of wrath by John Steinbeck, I studied it in school. I had to say that in front of the whole school during morning assembly for literature week

 

and he was awarded the noble prize in 1962 correct me if I'm wrong but I know I'm not love John Steinbeck my favourite of his was of mice and men.

 

scotty 94=25 points

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next question:

 

another old classic

 

“My meaning simply is, that whatever I have tried to do in life, I have tried with all my heart to do well; that whatever I have devoted myself to, I have devoted myself to completely; that in great aims and in small, I have always been thoroughly in earnest.”

 

author and book please.

 

scotty 94=28 points

Edited by scotty94

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Jo Ann!!!!!! You beauty.  Of course it is David Copperfield

 

Your turn. You have 6 points :P

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"probably by that time he learned that there were three things and no more:  breathing, pleasure, darkness..." 

 

Author and Story

 

Bonus question   Where is this author from?

 

Jo Ann 6 points

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Absalom, Absalom! by William Faulkner, and I believe he's from either Mississippi or Tennesee? Which one was it? Arg! Um...I think I associated something in his writing with Mark Twain, so I'm going to go with Mississippi.

Edited by thebrinkoftime

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Book and editor right, and Mississippi it is.  Chalk up your points Brink :great:

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Yay! I guess that means 7 points and 3 points for my new question brings me to: 29! Boogie, boogie!

 

And were we go with my problem:

 

"'What has he ever done except eat four square meals a day? His god is his belly, and he sacrifices burnt-offerings to it. If you opened that man now you would find enough lunch to support ten working-class families for a week.'"

 

It might be a little tricky to give the name of the work, but I'll accept either one. Hint, hint. For an extra point: How did one of this author's characters change the English language?

 

Get thee to a guessing box!

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Brink his work is hysterical and I read sum of his stuff when i was in school but this is a stumper dumper. Piggies lol. I had to google this so i cant answer.

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the answer brink is:

 

The Inimitable Jeeves by P.G Wodehouse

 

scotty94=34 points

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