Jump to content

Chips or Fries?


NaperVic

Recommended Posts

I got into a discussion a while back with a previously active GA member about what we American's call Fries (French Fries). Apparently in the UK, they call them chips...and what we call chips are Crisps. :blink:

 

Well, knowing that we have members from around the world, what do you call them?

 

1) the finger size wedges of potato that are then deep fried (US - Fries, UK - Chips)

2) the thin slices of potato that are then deep fried and usually sold in a sealed bag (US - Chips, UK - Crisps)

 

 

And if I said 'Tater Tot', you'd know what I meant, right? :unsure:

Edited by NaperVic
Link to comment
I got into a discussion a while back with a previously active GA member about what we American's call Fries (French Fries). Apparently in the UK, they call them chips...and what we call chips are Crisps. :blink:

 

Well, knowing that we have members from around the world, what do you call them?

 

1) the finger size wedges of potato that are then deep fried (US - Fries, UK - Chips)

2) the thin slices of potato that are then deep fried and usually sold in a sealed bag (US - Chips, UK - Crisps)

 

 

And if I said 'Tater Tot', you'd know what I meant, right? :unsure:

 

B) .........Don't forget those wonderful "curlycues" from Wendy's. :P

Link to comment
  • Site Administrator

Chips is the generic name in Australia for both of these things. We understand Fries and Crisps, too, but (at least where I live), most people just say "chips". Which type is derived from the context. If we're talking as part of a meal, it'll be french fries. If it's a packet of chips, it's crisps. If it's party food, it'll usually be crisps.

Link to comment

we call them, at least in quebec, respectively fries and chips.

 

In french here, you'd call them "frites" (sometimes "patates frites") and "Chips" (tho the right term would be "croustilles")

 

Also as a quebecois slang, you could call fries "une graisseuse" but that really, really show a lack of education.

 

Calling "Chips" here "crips", I certainly wouldn't understand that.

Link to comment

In Canada, I guess we are the same as the Aussie's. You can have Fries or Chips with a meal but if some says they're going to buy a bag of chips, they mean crisps. :blink:

 

I don't know if this is a regional thing but when you go to chain burger place, you order Fries but at least here (in and around the province of Quebec) we have fantastic ones made from double fried fresh potatoes from a Chip Truck.

 

Just to muddy the waters more, in the French parts of the country they refer to them as Frites.

 

Steve

Link to comment
Ya, but poutine that's an entire different things than fries. But ya, if you ever come to Quebec you just have to try poutines. it's simple they have some in every fast food franchise (A&W, burger king, McDo,,, and so on)

 

Poutine is, in my opinion, among the most revolting foods ever invented... Mmmm, cheese curds and gravy poured over deep fried potatoes :blink:

 

I had this problem when I first moved to London, as I used the American terminology, but now I'm fairly used to saying chips and crisps. I rarely eat either, but I still occasionally ask for chips when I mean crisps, and then get funny looks from people.

 

As an aside, it's interesting to note that even in America, nobody orders 'Fish n' fries,' they order 'Fish n' chips.'

 

Menzo

Link to comment
  • Site Administrator

Interesting regional differences, even in Canada.

 

Like elsewhere, if you want french fries, you'd ask for fries.

 

With the "bag of chips", we do call them potato chips, both words. So it would be "grab me a bag of potato chips, will ya?"

 

The crisps, I think we are usually referring to Mr.Christie (Nabisco in the US) "Crispers", which are flavoured baked, shaped thin crackers. (Not too sure, as I never really bought them for myself.

 

Steve B)

Link to comment
Interesting regional differences, even in Canada.

 

The crisps, I think we are usually referring to Mr.Christie (Nabisco in the US) "Crispers", which are flavoured baked, shaped thin crackers. (Not too sure, as I never really bought them for myself.

 

Steve B)

 

Steve's right on,, if someone were to tell me to buy some crips,, the only thing that would come in mind would be a "crispers" bag from Mr Christie

Link to comment
I got into a discussion a while back with a previously active GA member about what we American's call Fries (French Fries). Apparently in the UK, they call them chips...and what we call chips are Crisps. :blink:

 

Sigh. We English speaking peoples are separated by a common language.

 

 

And if I said 'Tater Tot', you'd know what I meant, right? :unsure:

 

You are Ron White's youngest son??? Ron "Tater Salad" White

Link to comment
1) the finger size wedges of potato that are then deep fried (US - Fries, UK - Chips)

I call it Fries. (must ave been americanised a bit! :P ) Though, some do say chips.

 

2) the thin slices of potato that are then deep fried and usually sold in a sealed bag (US - Chips, UK - Crisps)

 

Chips!!

 

Ieshwar

Link to comment

I'm not from an English speaking country, but anyway:

 

1) the finger size wedges of potato that are then deep fried (US - Fries, UK - Chips)

 

Pommes :P

 

2) the thin slices of potato that are then deep fried and usually sold in a sealed bag (US - Chips, UK - Crisps)

 

Chips

 

Tob

Link to comment

Fries and Chips, end of discussion.

 

The last time I went to an Outback Steakhouse was in Knoxville, Tennessee. The waiter asked me if I wanted chips with my burger and I replied, "Uh, fries?" He said, "Same thing, we call them chips here." He was cute, so I forgave him for forgetting exactly what country we were in. I don't care if the servers have to act Aussie there, they're still serving Americans! In America! Not Australia! Were this the land down under, then I would understand... but it's not!

Link to comment
  • Site Administrator
Fries and Chips, end of discussion.

 

The last time I went to an Outback Steakhouse was in Knoxville, Tennessee. The waiter asked me if I wanted chips with my burger and I replied, "Uh, fries?" He said, "Same thing, we call them chips here." He was cute, so I forgave him for forgetting exactly what country we were in. I don't care if the servers have to act Aussie there, they're still serving Americans! In America! Not Australia! Were this the land down under, then I would understand... but it's not!

I've eaten at an Outback Steakhouse. The food isn't Australian, anyway....

Link to comment
  • Site Moderator
With the "bag of chips", we do call them potato chips, both words. So it would be "grab me a bag of potato chips, will ya?"

Steve B)

Especially true since we have 'corn' chips as well.

Link to comment
Poutine is, in my opinion, among the most revolting foods ever invented... Mmmm, cheese curds and gravy poured over deep fried potatoes :blink:

I think the only thing revolting about this Poutine is that they forgot to include cooked bacon or sausage in it :D .

 

 

And I have noooooo idea what tater tots are....

 

Oh, Tater Tot's are one of the worlds greatest inventions for nutrition and feeding of school children across america... Here's Wikipedia's entry & here are the Ore-Ida® brand tater tots (scroll down)

Link to comment
  • Site Administrator
Oh, Tater Tot's are one of the worlds greatest inventions for nutrition and feeding of school children across america... Here's Wikipedia's entry ...

Ah! Now I know what they are. Sadly, they aren't that popular with my two boys -- we've tried them....

Link to comment
Especially true since we have 'corn' chips as well.

And don't forget about:

Tortilla chips

Bagel chips

Terra (vegi) chips

Pita chips

Sweet potato chips

Yam chips

Mushroom chips

Cassava chips

Banana chips

Cheese chips (Yes, cheese chips, and that's basically what's in them, really! Go here)

Pringles (genuine artificial imitation chips)

 

There are others, but I only listed the ones that are crunchy. Some of the fruit "chips" aren't crunchy, they're chewy. Some may sound exotic, but they're available in stores around where I'm going to college, and in my home town too.

 

Colin B)

Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Our Privacy Policy can be found here: Privacy Policy. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..