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What Science Fiction Books do you like?


Myr

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What Science Fiction books do you like?

Orson Scott Cards' Ender's Game and Ender's Shadow books are some of mine.

Some classics... Robert Heinlein's Stranger in a Strange Land and Starship Troopers.

Jurassic Park by Micheal Crichton fits sideways into Sci-Fi.

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A few books I've read:

The Halo Series - based off of the video games of the same name.

Joshua Dalzella's Omega Force Series, and his Black Fleet Series, and the new Expansion Wars Series.

Marko Kloos and the Frontlines Series.

Jack Campbell and his The Lost Fleet Series, along with The Lost Stars Series, and The Genesis Fleet.

 

Pretty Much all of the Star Wars "Legends" books from the New Jedi Order onward.

 

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Since I've been reading science fiction for more than sixty years, my list is long and varied starting with Asimov, Clarke, Heinlein, Bradbury, Pohl, Sturgeon, Anderson, Norton,  and many, many others.  

 

Here is a link to a GoodReads list of classic Sci-Fi covering the years 1950-1959 and it list some truly marvelous stories and I've read and about forgotten the details of most of them.....

 

https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/5152.Classic_Science_Fiction_1950_1959

Edited by Daddydavek
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My first real Sci-Fi book would be Harry Turtledove's Guns of the South series

 

I also got into his most famous series among fans of this genre, Worldwars, where an alien invasion occured in 1942 during the heat of world war II.

 

I read the original Jurassic Park and Lost World Novels by Michael Chricton, both were very different from the movies (Dr. Malcolm doesn't have a role past book 1)

 

I also was a huge fan of the Animorph series, which I still count as one of the best young adult novels about family, war, identity, and sacrifice.

 

Recently: I also read the Star Trek expanded universe series "Destiny" Novels chronicling a Borg armada invading the Alpha Quadrant and its connections to the events of the 22nd NX-02 Columbia's disappearance. I also read the follow up/aftermath novels, The Typhon Pact, and its tie ins.

 

For Star Wars, yes, I have also read most of the Expanded universe stories as well, i.e. Mara Jade's Emperor's hand novels, the story of Anakin Solo and his siblings Jacen Solo (Darth Cadeus) and sister Jaina Solo, along with a bunch of other characters who no longer exist in the "new Disney Canon".

 

There's a lot more sci-fi novels out there that I read over the years, but this would make good starting point.

 

PS:

 

Technically, I guess HG Wells Time Machine and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein were my first sci-fi books officially, Turtledove was my first non-school one :P

Edited by W_L
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  • 2 weeks later...

Similarly like @Daddydavek I’ve been reading science fiction for a long time (about 45 years), and I’ve read a lot published before I began reading sci-fi in at the beginning of my teens. So I have a long history of reading many, many great works of science fiction. Some of the authors currently on my bookshelf are Dan Simmons - Hyperion series; David Brin - the complete Uplift series; and just about everything Julie Czerneda has ever written (the rest are Kindle versions). Also I’d like to mention that I have a digital subscription (Kindle) to Fantasy&Science magazine, well worth the cost.

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Which scifi books do I like? Lol - the number is legion.

A few that are of particular significance to me :

 

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne - because it's the first scifi book I read at age 8 yrs.

Childhood's End by Arthur C Clarke

The Lensmen series by E E 'Doc' Smith - the first great space opera I encountered.

Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert Heinlein

The Cities in Flight series by James Blish

Songmaster by Orson Scott Card - an astonishingly beautiful story which still moves me when I reread it.

The Witches of Karres , Agent of Vega and almost every other story by James H Schmitz - an under-rated author I regard as being on par with any of the big name classic scifi authors.

A Voyage to Dari - Ian Wallace

The Dreaming Jewels by Theodore Sturgeon.

 

And thanks for the link to that list DD - everything went on hold for ages while I went though it.

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Just realized, no one has mentioned Frank Herbert yet, so I will give a shout out to the author of the Dune Series, basically one of the most amazing Sci-Fi social commentaries ever made. His work basically foreshadowed decades of middle eastern issues that would follow just as his series Dune continued into mankind's distant future..

 

Another author not mentioned among the late 20th century greats is my personal favorite, Philip K. Dick: known for A Scanner Darkly, Minority Report, Man in the High Castle, Do Androids dream of electric sheep?, Ubik, and Blade Runner. Basically, he's one of the greatest late 20th Century Sci-fi writers, challenging the concept of free society, human nature, and artificial intelligence. I freely admit he's an artistic inspiration for my story series 0's and 1's.

 

 

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11 hours ago, W_L said:

Philip K. Dick: known for

... being high on lots of stuff all the time.  All of the movies based on his stories come across as being an acid trip.

Also Total Recall is based on his short story "We Can Remember It For You Wholesale"

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1 hour ago, Myr said:

... being high on lots of stuff all the time.  All of the movies based on his stories come across as being an acid trip.

Also Total Recall is based on his short story "We Can Remember It For You Wholesale"

 

...And Hemingway was an alcoholic and Tennessee Williams was abusing god knows what :P

 

The more eccentric the writer the more interesting their stories.

 

He was a tad bit paranoid about government surveillance, probably a side effect of the drugs, but he did give us Minority Report and in the 1950's before he got dopey short story Adjustment Team aka The Adjustment Bureau, predicting an all-seeing, but not all knowing government bureaucracy we have in the modern world. He saw the future, not as an Orwellian authoritarian dystopia or a Roddenberry Socialist utopia, but just a reality of humanity as we have always been.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Dennis Taylor's Bobiverse

 

https://www.goodreads.com/series/192752-bobiverse

 

Craig Alanson's Expeditionary Force

 

https://www.goodreads.com/series/185650-expeditionary-force

 

David Weber's Honorverse

 

https://www.goodreads.com/series/40419-honor-harrington

 

David Weber, John Ringo Empire of Man

https://www.goodreads.com/series/40584-empire-of-man

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