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    CLJobe
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The Home - 37. Chapter 37

On Sunday after mass, Chad and Tom took the boys to the farm. I followed with my family after having a coffee in the fellowship hall of the church. Arriving home, I didn’t see the boys, so I figured they were showing Peter and John around the farm. While Amalia tended to the children, I started to prepare lunch, soup, and sandwiches. I brought several jars of broth from the basement, and I added some vegetables and pasta. We had a little leftover chicken which I diced and added to the broth.

For sandwiches, I used some of our cheese and my salami. Tomatoes and lettuce from the garden and two loves of store-bought bread. I made a stack of sandwiches which I placed on the dining room table. I would dish out the soup when it was ready, which wouldn’t take long. The soup was almost done when the boys came in from the farm.

“Wash up. Lunch is ready/.”

Later that evening, “Tony, these boys aren’t dumb. I explained everything to them once, and they got it right away.”

“Brad, something doesn’t sound right. Father said they were poor students and were given a certificate when they aged out.”

“Let Tom and I work with them. And see if we can determine what was the problem that they experienced in school.”

“Okay, in the meantime, continue to teach them about the farm.”

Two weeks later, Brad and Tom came into my office. “Tony, we know what Peter and John’s problems were with school. Both boys have dyslexia. We can help them.”

“We have to tell Father when we go to mass this Sunday. In the meantime, you can work with the boys, and they can continue to help you on the farm. Since they will be helping you, you’ll need to pay them.”

I laughed at their expression when I said that. I smiled, and they knew I would pay the boys.

Peter and John arrive at 8 am every morning. Brad and Tom left a list of jobs for them to do while they were away. When Brad and Tom came home, it was class time for the boys.

Amalia prepared lunch for Peter and John, I helped to prepare dinner. This was our routine, and in fewer than two weeks, it became a routine. Peter and John pitched in when we got busy. They were hard workers, and I think they appreciated what Brad and Tom were doing as well as having a job.

It took Brad and Tom 6 months to prepare them for the GED. I thought it would take them much longer. I mentioned that to Tom.

“Tony, the boys aren’t dumb. Their problem was reading. Once we explain mathematics to them, they rook off. The same with reading, once we explained what they were seeing and what was written, they began to read. It was simple. If you and I look at a capital E, we see three platforms to the post’s right, and they see those platforms to the left of the post. Once we explained what they are seeing is an E, they then started to connect words. The idea is to let them see the word and pronounce the word. Unless there are people trained to recognize this and work with people suffering from dyslexia, the problem will reflect itself as a slow learner. It’s like learning a code. Once they understand the code, they can do the work.”

“That seems simple.”

“It isn’t simple. I gave you a simple example. Depending on the degree of dyslexia, they may not even see the word, and there is no cure for it. These boys will have to live with this the rest of their lives.”

“Isn’t there some way of providing help outside of school?”

“Not that I know of. Having someone reading or giving instructions utilizing a tape recorder would help. They understand what you tell them, it’s the reading that is their problem. They have picked up on the farm work very quickly.”

“I would have thought by the time they reached high school. It would have been detected.”

“Not everyone can understand this, and the child is labeled as a slow learner, relegated to the back of the class.”

“I’m glad that you and Brad have taken these boys under your wing. I wonder how many other children in the schools are in the same position, and they are never diagnosed and helped.”

“Probably quite a few. Not only are they deprived of an education, but they have the stigma of being dumb. Teachers tolerate them, and they are passed on age, not merit. “.

“That would be horrible. What a waste of an intelligent being. What discoveries, what stories, could be lost because a child was suffering from this and wasn’t helped. “

“It happens”

Later that evening in the apartment, “Brad, how would you feel if I take a year off and study dyslexia, how to recognize it and treat it. I talked with Tony, and he mentioned the loss of intellect that would happen if this wasn’t recognized and helped.”

“I have no problem as long as you are still here. If you had to go away for a long time, I would miss you.”

“I could come home for weekends.”

“Who would take care of the farm on weekends.”

“The boys”

Peter and John did pass their GED’s. Tony talked to them about college. They weren’t sure they could handle the workload. Tony mentioned it to Father, and at the following Mass, Father announced it to the congregation. The boys were the center of attraction during coffee hour.

Copyright © 2021 CLJobe; All Rights Reserved.
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Chapter Comments

6 hours ago, weinerdog said:

I remember in the U.S.dyslexia wasn't part of the public discourse until the late eighties in this story's time period it was unheard of by the general public.Brad and Tom were pretty smart to be able to detect it.

Actually I encounter it in Puerto Rico when my daughter was learning Spanish. They noticed it and she went to a specialist for treatment. This was in the early 70's

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6 hours ago, Freddie1 said:

My brother suffered from dyslexia and i  can say for a fact that what Tom said is the truth. He was great at working with his hands but reading was a challenge. Once he understood a subject you would be hard pressed to prove him wrong. 

My brother suffered from it in the 40's and he was thought to be retarded. He worked with my dad and did well.

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6 hours ago, chris191070 said:

It's the same in this country, not much specialism in dyslexia. I'm glad the boys got the help they needed.

It is more common then people think

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3 hours ago, mikedup said:

Great chapter,a chance the boys have taken and excelled at, they certainly proved that they can do it and did , help that they needed was just never given, a really sad reflection on humans in general

Thinking back to my early school years I knew several who were thought to be slow. I'm sure they suffered from this as well.

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3 hours ago, Chris L said:

I anticipate the future for Tom will be opening a school, or a learning curriculum at his school, focused on dyslexia and other learning challenges. It often amazes me, when one truly spends the time necessary with an individual - encouraging, supporting, and validating - what is uncovered that society, in all its' realms, has covered in years of layers of self loathe. 

You are right. Society tends to hide what they don't understand. Makes one wonder what genius was classified as dumb because they couldn't read

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dyslexia can be minor, just causing a slowness in reading speed or major, requiring intensive training. It effects about 7% of the population to some extent, with males being more often affected than females (why?). Training of the dylexic can not cure the problem, but it can help him greatly – even to the extent that for all practical purposes, the problem dissappears.

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59 minutes ago, Will Hawkins said:

dyslexia can be minor, just causing a slowness in reading speed or major, requiring intensive training. It effects about 7% of the population to some extent, with males being more often affected than females (why?). Training of the dylexic can not cure the problem, but it can help him greatly – even to the extent that for all practical purposes, the problem dissappears.

Yes, it has been in my family and if you aren't aware of it, the child will suffer

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58 minutes ago, drsawzall said:

Great chapter, showing how problems can be identified and resolved!!

Thanks, a little interest, a little effort and a little help.

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My youngest son we always thought was a good reader, but struggled with an attitude. I mean he read the whole of series like the Phillip Pullman, and Harry Potter books. When they did diagnose dyslexia just before high school I asked how he managed to read the books if he was dyslexic. He shrugged, "If I couldn't read or understand I just skipped it and tried the next." Turned out some books as a result of that and not getting the help he needed, he had simply skimmed as best he could. (He is now taking a university course to become a social worker and is a carer in the community during this terrible time.) I'm looking forward to finding out more about these boys. 

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9 hours ago, Kev said:

My youngest son we always thought was a good reader, but struggled with an attitude. I mean he read the whole of series like the Phillip Pullman, and Harry Potter books. When they did diagnose dyslexia just before high school I asked how he managed to read the books if he was dyslexic. He shrugged, "If I couldn't read or understand I just skipped it and tried the next." Turned out some books as a result of that and not getting the help he needed, he had simply skimmed as best he could. (He is now taking a university course to become a social worker and is a carer in the community during this terrible time.) I'm looking forward to finding out more about these boys. 

Dyslexia is more common then most people realize. I don't think it has been included in Education courses at Colleges or Universities. Makes you wonder how many children are ostracized in an learning environment because of unawareness on the part of the teachers.

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Also, be aware that some parents refuse to admit their child has any sort of disability or shortcoming and any difficulty is the fault of the teacher.  I came across this many times in 31+ years in the schools.  In some areas, the government will give you support funds if you have a special needs child.  I actually had a student in one high school who was ready to graduate and the mother tried to get us to rescind his diploma!  We finally figured out that she would lose the extra funds and the use of his babysitting services for his infant sister.  He graduated.

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16 minutes ago, Clancy59 said:

Also, be aware that some parents refuse to admit their child has any sort of disability or shortcoming and any difficulty is the fault of the teacher.  I came across this many times in 31+ years in the schools.  In some areas, the government will give you support funds if you have a special needs child.  I actually had a student in one high school who was ready to graduate and the mother tried to get us to rescind his diploma!  We finally figured out that she would lose the extra funds and the use of his babysitting services for his infant sister.  He graduated.

You are right, many parents don't understand about dyslexia, and feel it is a black mark against them. It is much easier to blame someone else then to ask for professional help. The woman who didn't want her son to graduate, is typical of people who use the system as a crutch and never want to give it up.

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