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    CLJobe
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The Home - 9. Chapter 9

I was walking outside when I called. I was looking at the ground behind the garage. It would be convenient if the sewage lines were there. “Hi Mom, I have a question. Where can I find out where’s the sewer line on the property?….Oh that, I’m having the roof on the barn repaired….Yes, I’ve decided to get horses to pull the carriage….Yes. I’ll give you a ride in it. So, sewer line?…. At the courthouse?….Okay, I’ll check there. Oh, do you know who put the sewer line in?…Okay, I’ll check in the Library….Yes, I’m getting my prep work done. I ordered my office furniture today….Yes, but it’s very old and well used…..No, the furniture will be mine. Why don’t you and Dad come over on Sunday? I’ll cook?….Good, see you then.

One of the boys came into the kitchen, “Tony, where are you?”

“I’m right here.”

“Can we have a bottle or thermos of cold water? It’s hot up on that roof.”

“Sure, I think there’s a gallon thermos in the basement. I’ll get it.”

I remember seeing it there. I found it on the shelves with the canned tomatoes. I needed to rinse it out. I think Pa had wine in it.

Going back up the kitchen, I proceeded to rinse it out several times until I couldn’t smell any traces of wine, added ice cubes, and filled it with water. “If you need more, just come and get it.”

I went to the Library to see if I could find any records on the house. I started to look in the archives, where the books were number according to years. My ancestors were meticulous in keeping records, something I’ll have to continue.

I started when my great-grandfather lived here. I pulled the books and stacked them on the table, by years. This would be my evening project. I started from the latest book, thinking that if he mentions anything in it, I can go further back in years. After reading that last entry, I noted that they didn’t have any electricity at that time. This meant my grandfather was the one who installed the electric and the sewerage system as well.

Now I had to go through his records from the first record until I find the information I needed. I started at the first book, which covered the first ten years. I got about halfway through when the boys came in to say they were quitting for the day.

“We got the plywood on the roof finished. Tomorrow will start with the shingles, that won’t take long. We’ll clean up the area after we’re finished. You’ll need a dumpster to have it hauled away.”

“Are you planning on staying for dinner?”

“We haven’t been invited.”

Chuckling, “Okay, would you both like to join me for dinner?”

Smiling, “It would be our pleasure.”

“Go get cleaned up while I start dinner.” As I went to the kitchen, thinking about feeding the boys, I’ll need to go shopping tomorrow.

The boys came back, and we chatted about the apartment. “What will our rent be if we decide to take the apartment?”

“I haven’t given it much thought. I’d expect you to pay your electric bill, as to anything over that, I think it would depend on how much you helped out here.”

“Paying for our electricity wouldn’t be a problem. We could work for the rest of our rent.”

“Like what?”

“We could take care of the horses, work the gardens, do general repairs.”

I thought about that, and it sounded okay. With my load at the University, I wouldn’t need to worry about the grounds and the horses. “Okay, that sounds like a deal, if you take care of the horses, the gardens, and the grounds. All you’ll have to pay for is the electricity you use. There isn’t a gas line to the garage, so you’ll have an electric range. One other thing, in the living room, behind the sofa, there’s a fireplace. That is your only heat source. So you’ll need to chop wood. I’ll have the chimney cleaned when I have mine cleaned as well.”

The house had one disadvantage, there wasn’t any central heating. I remember asking Pa, and he said to install it, they would have to destroy some of the walls. I could understand that the outside walls were thick. You could see that at the window sills. One thing that helped, the house was well insulated. The living room and the dining room had fireplaces, as well as the Library. The bedrooms didn’t have any, which was nice snuggling under the blankets at night, but you had to hustle in the morning. Getting up from a warm bed to a cold room woke you up real quick.

We sat down for dinner, and I realized that my food bill would take a hit. “What do you think about getting some chickens. We could convert one of the stalls in the barn for chickens.” I thought that was a good idea.

“Tom, we could cut a hot in the side of the barn, fence in a run. That would let the chickens out.”

“Will need a roost and nests. I might have to build the front of the stall up a little higher. I wouldn’t want the chickens to get into the barn. Might scare the horses.”

I listen to these farm boys. So I’ll have chickens. I’m waiting for them to suggest a cow or a goat.

Copyright © 2021 CLJobe; All Rights Reserved.
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It will be self sustainable and the boys will soon have it like they were on a farm, when they get the horses, chickens and probably a cow

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1 minute ago, chris191070 said:

It will be self sustainable and the boys will soon have it like they were on a farm, when they get the horses, chickens and probably a cow

And who knows what else. There isn't any objections from Tony, he's loving this.

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Always wanted to have a go at milking, thought it would be a cow but after Lucinius I reckon I could handle a goat or a sheep even. When the boys get that far let me know and I'll be there... Mind you make sure the they give me the ewe otherwise there could be some very confused and happy rams at the house.🤣🤭🤪

Loving the idea of the new furniture in his office, reckon I could flog the old stuff at the charity store I work at so if the others leave any pass it all my way. Quite looking forward to seeing the house take shape and the secrets that these books about the house will reveal.

 

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Snuggling under the covers is one thing. Jumping out of bed and it shriveling up to nothing is another thing! 😂

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Great progress on the barn I would think that they will need another source of heat in the winter , chicken 🐓 could be great meat and eggs , seems like a good idea

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10 hours ago, chris191070 said:

It will be self sustainable and the boys will soon have it like they were on a farm, when they get the horses, chickens and probably a cow

Yes, the boys are recreating a farm and Tony is all for  it

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8 hours ago, mfa607 said:

Great chapter!  The guys will definitely be of help!  Thank you.

The boys are a great help. It won't be long before they will have a farm like they did at home. For them, it will be a home substitute 

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5 hours ago, mikedup said:

Great progress on the barn I would think that they will need another source of heat in the winter , chicken 🐓 could be great meat and eggs , seems like a good idea

Yes, they will need to sort out some form of heat for the barn.  I don't think that wood stove will work.

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9 hours ago, Chris L said:

Snuggling under the covers is one thing. Jumping out of bed and it shriveling up to nothing is another thing! 😂

That could lead to a rather vigorous rub, anything to 'warm' up.

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Hi Cal:

I'm playing 'catch up' on The Home and so far its coming along well. A hiccup or two along with way, but nothing to comment on. But now... a little lengthy comment, please bear with me. :read:

In this chapter Tony talks about lack of central heating and the reasons behind it: "The house had one disadvantage, there wasn’t any central heating. I remember asking Pa, and he said to install it, they would have to destroy some of the walls. I could understand that the outside walls were thick. You could see that at the window sills. One thing that helped, the house was well insulated." 🔨 (Full disclosure, my great & great-great grandfather were engineers, architects, constructors as far back as 1800's)

As mentioned in some previous chapters, starting with the first), this Home - in effect a design extension of the Kings 1800 villa in Italy, (for obvious reasons being commissioned by the king for his son) - would have been built to standards of that era which for security reasons more than comfort would have had substantial exterior walls, well over a foot in thickness and in many cases a metre (3.2 feet) thick. This 'home' in America standard 'non-fortified' home would be about 12 - 18 inches exterior walls. Interior walls (not load bearing) would have been a version of lathe and plaster (L&P is literally 1/4" x 1" wood slats covered in plaster) but little space for running internal services such as water pipes, electrical, let alone heating ducts. Although his Pa did run some electrical (knob & wire at the time), and there is plumbing. In fact, even that small space between L&P interior walls would allow for chases (tubes / spaces) to run updated wiring, water and plumbing lines. As for heating, hot water radiators (water fed from basement boilers) can and often are installed without destroying walls. Many of my grandfathers 'antique homes' have been upfitted with radiant underfloor heating.

Given what's in the safe including paper money, jewels, coins (American and European gold coins from the king would be worth 'a King's ransom' today, pun intended), plus whatever else Tony has yet to discover, should have give him sufficient resources to upgrade the home/villa and outbuildings. I suspect the more he digs (literally), the more he'll find.💰💰👑

Enough building (homes and money) history for Chapter 9. Small comments to follow other chapters, or not.

Stay safe, Mask Up, Get the Jab 💉 . Cal you're more than eligible now.!

:thankyou:

Tony B

Edited by Anton_Cloche
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7 minutes ago, Anton_Cloche said:

Hi Cal:

I'm playing 'catch up' on The Home and so far its coming along well. A hiccup or two along with way, but nothing to comment on. But now... a little lengthy comment, please bear with me. :read:

In this chapter Tony talks about lack of central heating and the reasons behind it: "The house had one disadvantage, there wasn’t any central heating. I remember asking Pa, and he said to install it, they would have to destroy some of the walls. I could understand that the outside walls were thick. You could see that at the window sills. One thing that helped, the house was well insulated." 🔨 (Full disclosure, my great & great-great grandfather were engineers, architects, constructors as far back as 1800's)

As mentioned in some previous chapters, starting with the first), this Home - in effect a design extension of the Kings 1800 villa in Italy, (for obvious reasons being commissioned by the king for his son) - would have been built to standards of that era which for security reasons more than comfort would have had substantial exterior walls, well over a foot in thickness and in many cases a metre (3.2 feet) thick. This 'home' in America standard 'non-fortified' home would be about 12 - 18 inches exterior walls. Interior walls (not load bearing) would have been a version of lathe and plaster (L&P is literally 1/4" x 1" wood slats covered in plaster) but little space for running internal services such as water pipes, electrical, let alone heating ducts. Although his Pa did run some electrical (knob & wire at the time), and there is plumbing. In fact, even that small space between L&P interior walls would allow for chases (tubes / spaces) to run updated wiring, water and plumbing lines. As for heating, hot water radiators (water fed from basement boilers) can and often are installed without destroying walls. Many of my grandfathers 'antique homes' have been upfitted with radiant underfloor heating.

Given what's in the safe including paper money, jewels, coins (American and European gold coins from the king would be worth 'a King's ransom' today, pun intended), plus whatever else Tony has yet to discover, should have give him sufficient resources to upgrade the home/villa and outbuildings. I suspect the more he digs (literally), the more he'll find.💰💰👑

Enough building (homes and money) history for Chapter 9. Small comments to follow other chapters, or not.

Stay safe, Mask Up, Get the Jab 💉 . Cal you're more than eligible now.!

:thankyou:

Tony B

Thanks for this information. I'm sure over time changes were made to the house as each "grandfather" took over. I remember my grandfather's home, there wasn't any central heating until I was 14. He had fire places, I used some of that in my story.  This story is somewhat an upbeat version of my grandparents home and my personal; interactions with them.

I do mask up, received my first inoculation the second scheduled for March 3rd.

 

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2 minutes ago, CLJobe said:

Thanks for this information. I'm sure over time changes were made to the house as each "grandfather" took over. I remember my grandfather's home, there wasn't any central heating until I was 14. He had fire places, I used some of that in my story.  This story is somewhat an upbeat version of my grandparents home and my personal; interactions with them.

I do mask up, received my first inoculation the second scheduled for March 3rd.

 

:thumbup: 

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With thick stone walls, the windows become the greatest heat-loss item, but replacing the single pane glass with double pane will take care of that. Unless the windows have leaded, diamond panes, then heat loss becomes an important factor and one that is not easily (read 'cheaply') overcome without destroying the appearance of the exterior. Maybe adding shutters to the inside, so as not to destroy the appearance of the exterior, could be a soultion. However, in that case, the views in looking OUT suffers. As the King od Siam says to Anna, "It is a puzzlement!"

Mister Will

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On 3/6/2021 at 6:55 AM, Will Hawkins said:

With thick stone walls, the windows become the greatest heat-loss item, but replacing the single pane glass with double pane will take care of that. Unless the windows have leaded, diamond panes, then heat loss becomes an important factor and one that is not easily (read 'cheaply') overcome without destroying the appearance of the exterior. Maybe adding shutters to the inside, so as not to destroy the appearance of the exterior, could be a soultion. However, in that case, the views in looking OUT suffers. As the King od Siam says to Anna, "It is a puzzlement!"

Mister Will

Generally with older homes heavy curtains or drapes are used to block out the cold air. I'm sure that this home had those type of window coverings. 

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